CONTENTS





CRIMINAL LAW NEWS

Findlaw Crime News
CNN Crime News
Breaking Legal News
Prison Legal News (1), (2)
ACLU - Crim Justice, Death Penalty, Human Rights & Police
Jurist Paper Chase News
TruTv (Cases in the news.)
About Crime & Pinishment


BLAWGS* (BLOGS) WITH A CRIMINAL LAW BENT

Res Ipsa Loquitur - Professor Turley's blawg; it's always interesting and my favorite, in part, because this guardian of the Constitution was one of the few law professors in
the country with the spine to go public with the idea of war crimes investigation of
the devastating Bush2 crew. (1) (Bullets 7)
Grits for Breakfast - A progressive non-lawyer Texan writes about crim justice.
A Houston Criminal Lawyer's Prize-Winning Blawg Lawyer Bennett has a flair for provocative writing re local courthouse doings.
[Sidebar: I'm one of Mark's fans, but if you email him, be aware that he may print your private communication
and "paraphrase" your actual words.]
Simple Justice It's hard to top this NY criminal lawyer's site.
A Public Defender Useful insight into this branch of the profession.
Lammer's Criminal Palaver  I like his graphics and his list of blawgs.
Crim Law Professors Blawg Worth a look.
White Collar Crime  Blawg Pretty decent coverage.
The Race to the Bottom This one, focusing on corporate governance,
is a product of students and faculty at the University of Denver. Hats off.
The Politics of Crime - Talk Left Blawg - This lady criminal lawyer has been
palavering on the web for years. She deserves a place for longevity.
Crime and Consequences Blawg - This one is pro-prosecution.
Lexington Ky. Prosecutor Blawg - Need I say, it's pro-prosecution.
Clews - Here's a true-crime story blog.
DUI (DWI) Blawg
Sex Crimes Blawg
Capital Punishment Blawg
This one also has a long list of other capital punishment blawgs.
Capital Punishment Blawg - Texas
Sentencing News Blawg
This one has hyperlinks to the best crim law blawgs.
Corrections Blawg
Think Outside the Cage - Corrections Blawg
SCOTUS BLAWG - Supreme Court doings.
Directory of Blawgs
Crim Law Blawg Search (+-225  of 'em ranked in order of current activity)
Crim Law Blawg Search



BLAWGS WITH GENERAL LEGAL INFORMATION

Wall Street Journal - Legal News
Above the Law Tabloidy
Courthouse News
Dorf on Law - Musings on law.
Volokh Conspiracy Blawg
Becker-Posner Blog This one, in an intellectual league apart, presents
two of our most brilliant thinkers, Judge Richard A. Posner **
of the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals and Nobel laureate Gary Becker.


* A law blog (blawg) is a web site maintained by an opinionated and enthusiastic lawyer/professor.
They come and go by the fistful, but some of the survivors keep on ginning out good info.
As blawgs mature, so the content can become more provocative and useful;
in the early stages it's often mere egotistical prattle and jawboning.
Good blawgs have frequent updates and links to other blawgs.
There are presently several thousand of them.
Good on ya, Murgatroid!
**Posner is the author of A Failure of Capitalism: The Crisis of '08 and the Descent into Depression (2009).
I don't think he should be too proud of this though.


SCHOLARLY PUBLICATIONS DEVOTED
to
CRIMINAL LAW & CRIMINAL PROCEDURE
If you like reading about criminal law, the Ohio Journal of Criminal Law, run by our
pal Dressler, is on-line with some free downloadable crim law articles. See below.

American Criminal Law Review Online
Georgetown University Law Center - 4X (published 4 times per year)
600 New Jersey Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20001
(202) 662 - 9250
(You'll pay these DC folks for any of the ACLR articles on-line. Use the law library.)

American Journal of Criminal Law
University of Texas School of Law - 3X
P.O. Box 8670
Austin, Texas 78713
(512) 232-1149
(These Texans from my alma mater require that you pay for
any of the AJCL articles. Use the law library.)

American Journal of Trial Advocacy
Cumberland School of Law of Samford University
800 Lakeshore Drive, Suite 301
Birmingham, AL 35229

Berkeley Journal of Criminal Law
493A Simon Hall
University of California, Berkeley
School of Law
Berkeley, CA 94720-7200

British Journal of Criminology

Buffalo Criminal Law Review
State University of New York at Buffalo Law School - 2X530
John Lord O'Brian Hall
Buffalo, New York 14260
(716) 645-2016
Note: This previously excellent review still has some of its articles from 1999-2005
online for free in PDF format. In 2007 it morphed into a strictly cash
commercial operation in new wrappings dubbed The New Criminal Law Review, see below.

California Criminal Law Review
School of Law - Boalt Hall
University of California
Berkeley, California
(Coin of the realm is required by this Golden State review. Use the law library.) 

Capital Defense Journal
Virginia Capital Case Clearinghouse
School of Law
Washington & Lee University
Lexington, VA 24450
(540) 458-8557

Crime and Delinquency (1)
Department of Criminal Justice and Behavior - 4X
California State University
1250 Bellflower Boulevard
Long Beach, California 90840

Crime and Justice:A Review of Research
Castine Research Corporation - 1X
40 Main Street
Castine, Maine 04421
(207) 326-9521

ABA Criminal Justice Magazine
(Note: A few articles from this publication of the ABA Criminal Justice Section are now
viewable  on-line for free, but most require that you pay up for a ABA and CJS membership.)

Criminal Justice Ethics
Institute for Criminal Justice Ethics - 2X
John Jay College of Criminal Justice
555 West 57th Street, Suite 601
New York, New York 10019

Criminal Justice and Behavior
Department of Psychology - 2X
Fordham University
Bronx, New York 10458

Criminal Law Bulletin
Newsletter
James E. Robertson
Department of Sociology and Corrections
Minnesota State University
Mankato, MN 56001
(You'll pay Thompson-West Publishing for this publication.)

Criminal Law Forum
Official Journal of the Society for the Reform of Criminal Law
Rutgers University School of Law - Camden - 3X
Fifth & Penn Streets
Camden, New Jersey 08102
(856) 225-6352
(Viewable online in PDF format. Ave CLF!)

Federal Probation
Administrative Office of the United States Courts - 3X
One Columbus Circle
Washington, D.C. 20544
(202) 502-2600

Federal Sentencing Reporter
323 Green Street - 6X
New Haven,  Connecticut 06511
(203) 772-2543
(Costly.)

Georgetown Law Journal: Annual Review of Criminal  Procedure
600 New Jersey Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20001
(202) 662-9890

Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology
Northwestern University School of Law - 4X
357 East Chicago Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60611
(312) 503- 8547
(There is nothing free from these Lakeshore Drive denizens of my alma mater.
Go to the law library for the text of the articles.)

Journal of Criminal Justice - 6X
P.O. Box 131279
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48113

Journal of Criminal Justice and Popular Culture
Note: Bully to this journal for placing its articles on-line for free.

The New Criminal Law Review
State University of New York at Buffalo Law School
530 O'Brian Hall
Buffalo, New York 14260
(This was formerly the excellent  Buffalo Criminal Law Review but has morphed
into a cash-on-the-line operation.Save your money. Use the law library.)

New England Journal of Criminal and Civil Confinement
New England School of Law - 2X
154 Stuart Street
Boston, Massachusetts 02116
(617) 422-7451

Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law   (CCJA Rating: Top-Gun)
The Ohio State University - 2X
Moritz College of Law
55 West 12th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
(614) 688-3781
(This one is the big-boy-on-the-block, guided by criminal law gurus Dressler,
Berman, and Michaels. The PDF form of the Ohio St. J. Crim. L. graciously
allows you to view and print all its excellent articles for free.)

The Prosecutor
National District Attorneys Association
44 Cana Center Plaza, Suite 110
Alexandria, VA 22314
(Nothing is free here. All articles are locked-down.)

Western Criminology Review

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal
Institute of Bill of Rights Law
William and Mary Law School
P.O. Box 8795
Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795
(The home page contains hyperlinks to numerous free online notes.)

Women and Criminal Justice
Department of Criminal Justice - 4X
Shippensburg University
1871 Old Main Drive
Shippensburg, Pennsylvania 17257
(717) 477-1608

New Articles & Books on Criminal Law

Law Reviews and Journals On Line

Criminal Justice Cyberlibrary

Links to Legal Journals

Law Journals Listed

Google Search for Scholarly Papers

Questia Search for Scholarly Publications

Free Abstracts of Chosen Subjects, e.g., Criminal Law, in Law Review Articles - Via Email

SSRN Electronic Library
(Professors Kahan and Robinson have accumulated hundreds of abstracts in their 
SSRN - Social Science and Research Network - criminal law and criminal procedure database;
the site  has a number of specialized research networks including legal scholarship; many free downloads are available; sign in/join here.)

Directory of Open Access Journals - Law
(This world resource includes sixty-six (66) free legal journals, few criminal.)


Bibliographies

Bibliography of Criminal Justice Ethics

Bibliography re Victims of Crime (excellent resource)

Bibliography re Victims of Crime

Bibliography of Criminology Web Sites


References & Encyclopedias

Cornell Site on Criminal Law

Findlaw Site on Criminal Law Cases

Encyclopedia of Criminal Law

Encyclopedia of Law & Economics
(Economics of Crime and Law Enforcement)


Bibliography of
SELECTED RECENT AND CLASSIC SCHOLARLY ARTICLES
on
CRIMINAL LAW SUBJECTS

There are more than 500 student-edited law reviews and journals published in the US. Those produced at first and second-tier law schools, e.g., Harvard, Yale, Stanford, Pennsylvania, Chicago, Virginia, Northwestern, Columbia, California, Michigan, Texas, Duke, Georgetown, North Carolina, UCLA, Cornell, etc. are typically of excellent quality and are often cited by other journals and in court opinions. The same cannot be said for the publications of third and fourth-tier institutions. Articles and comments from these institutions can only be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.
Here's an unofficial ranking from a law librarian.  See Richard A. Posner, The Future of the Student-Edited Law Review, 47 Stan. L. Rev. 1131 (1995). (Posner is a jurist on the 7th Circuit and co-author of one of the best blawgs extant.)

What I have collected here is a potpourri of scholarly publications, most of them fairly recent, on subjects close to the heart of the study of substantive criminal law. Students may find it helpful in providing context for briefing and reciting on individual cases to read a relevant resource listed below and share valuable aspects of it with other members of the class in e-discussion postings and in class recitations.
Students in my class who are not doing courthouse visitation fieldwork must choose one of the law review articles listed below for their LRA summary report. See Fieldwork

Notice that I don't utilize the classic green book or  blue-book style of citation. Do not emulate my approach in citing any of these secondary resources in briefs filed with courts or in your
Legal Research and Writing courses. I simply find the style that follows more informative
and easier for those not yet familiar with the blue-book requirements..
To find an article in a particular journal or law review, try the Guide to Current Law Review Content.

Free Reading of Superb Online Articles in the Ohio Joural of Criminal Law

History of Criminal Law
+ Leonard, Towards a Legal History of American Criminal Theory: Culture and Doctrine from Blackstone to the Model Penal Code, Buffalo Criminal Law Review, Vol. 6, No. 2, page 691 (2004).

Rethinking Criminal Law
+ Robinson, The Modern Irrationalities of American Criminal Codes: An Empirical Study of Offense Grading, Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol. 100, page 709 (2010).
+ Symposium, Twenty-Five Years of George Fletcher's Rethinking Criminal Law, Tulsa Law Review, Vol. 39, page 737 (2004).
+ Denno, When Two Become One: Views on Fletcher's 'Two Patterns of Criminality', Tulsa Law Review Vol. 39, page 781 (2004).

Statutory Construction
+ Solan, Private Language, Public Laws: The Central Role of Legislative Intent in Statutory Interpretation, Georgetown Law Review, Vol. 93, page 427 (2005).
+ Batey, Vagueness and Construction of Criminal Statutes - Balancing Acts, Virginia Journal of Social Policy & Law, Vol. 5, page 1 (1997).
+ Meares et al., The Wages of Antiquated Procedural Thinking: A Critique of Chicago v. Morales, 1988 University of Chicago Legal Forum, Vol 197.
+ Shapiro, Continuity and Change in Statutory Interpretation, N.Y.U. Law Review, Vol. 67, page 921 (1992).
+ Kelman, Interpretive Construction in the Substantive Criminal Law, Stanford Law Review, Vol. 33, page 591 (1981).

Purpose of Criminal Law
+ Ashworth, Concepts of Overcriminalization, Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 5,  page 401 (2008).
+ Robinson, Does Criminal Law Deter? A Behavioral Science Investigation, Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, Vol. 24, page 173 (2004)
+ Luna, Principled Enforcement of Penal Codes, Buffalo Criminal Law Review, Vol. 4, page 515 (2000).
+ Dworkin, Devlin Was Right: Law and the Enforcement of Morality, William & Mary Law Review, Vol. 40, page 959 (1999).
+ Robinson, Objectivist vs. Subjectivist Views of Criminality: A Study in the Role of Role of Science in Criminal Law Theory, Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, Vol. 18, page 409 (1998).
+ Robinson, A Functional Analysis of Criminal Law, Northwestern University Law Review, Vol. 88, page 857 (1994).
+ Dressler, Hating Criminals: How Can Something that Feels So Good Be Wrong?, University of Michigan Law Review, Vol. 88, page 1148 (1990).
+ Posner, An Economic Theory of the Criminal Law, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 85, page 1193 (1985).
+ Seidman, Soldiers, Martyrs, and Criminals: Utilitarian Theory and the Problem of Crime Control, Yale Law Journal, Vol. 94, page 315 (1984).
+ Hughes, Criminal Responsibility, Stanford Law Review, Vol. 16, page 470 (1964).
+ Hart, The Aims of the Criminal Law, Law and Contemporary Problems, Vol. 23, page 401 (1958).

Model Penal Code (Note: Professor Herbert Wechsler is generally viewed as the father of the Model Penal Code.)
+ Selected Provisions of MPC.
+ Selected List of Readings re MPC.
+ Symposium on the Model Penal Code, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 63, page 589 (1963).
+ Cahill, Offense Grading and Multiple Liability: New Challenges for a Model Penal Code Second, Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 1, page 599 (2004).
+ Robinson et al., Can a Model Penal Code Second Save the States from Themselves?, Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 1, page 169 (2003).
+ Lynch, Revising the Model Penal Code: Keeping It Real, Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 1, page 219 (2003)
+ Dubber, Penal Panopticon: The Idea of a Modern Model Penal Code, Buffalo Criminal Law Review, Vol. 4, page 53 (2000).
+ Gainer, The Culpability Provisions of the Model Penal Code, Rutgers Law Journal, Vol. 19, page 575 (1988).
+ Kadish, The Model Penal Code's Historical Antecedents, Rutgers Law Journal, Vol. 19, page 521 (1988).
+ Low, The Model Penal Code, the Common Law, and Mistakes of Fact: Recklessness, Negligence, or Strict Liability, Rutgers Law Journal, Vol. 19, page 539 (1988).
+ Robinson & Grall, Element Analysis in Defining Criminal Liability, Stanford Law Review, Vol. 35, page 681 (1983).
+ Treiman, Recklessness and the Model Penal Code, American Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 9, page 281 (1981).
+ Wechsler, Codification of the Criminal Law in the United States:The Model Penal Code, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 68, page 1424 (1968).
+ Packer, The Model Penal Code and Beyond, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 63, page 594 (1963).
+ Wechsler, A Thoughtful Code of Substantive Law, Journal of Criminal Law, Criminology and Police Science, Vol. 45, page 524 (1955).
+ Wechsler, The Challenge of a Model Penal Code, Harvard Law Review, Vol. 65, page 1097 (1952).

American Penal Codes (TPC)
+ Robinson et al, The Accelerating Degradation of American Criminal Codes, Hastings Law Journal, Vol. 56, page 633 (2005).
+ Robinson et al., The Five Worst (and Five Best) American Penal Codes, Northwestern University Law Review, Vol. 95, page 1 (2000).

Fair Notice, Void-for-Vagueness, Overbreadth, Privacy and Other Limitations on the Criminal Law
+ Franke, The Domesticated Liberty of Lawrence v. Texas, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 104, page 1339 (2004).
+ Spindelman, Surviving Lawrence v. Texas, Michigan Law Review, Vol. 102, page 1615 (2004).
+ Sunstein, Liberty After Lawrence, Ohio State Law Journal, Vol. 65, page 1059 (2004).
+ Goldsmith, The Void-for-Vagueness Doctrine in the Supreme Court, Revisited, American Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 30, No. 2, page 135 (2003).
+ Decker, Addressing Vagueness, Ambiguity, and Other Uncertainly in American Criminal Laws, Denver University Law Review, Vol. 80, page 241 (2002).
+ Hill, Vagueness and Police Discretion: The Supreme Court in a Box, Rutgers Law Review, Vol. 51, page 1289 (1999).
+ Batey, Vagueness and Construction of Criminal Statutes - Balancing Acts, Virginia Journal of Social Policy & Law, Vol. 5, page 1 (1997).
+ Allen, The Erosion of Legality in American Criminal Justice: Some Latter-Day Adventures of the Nulla Poena Principle, Arizona Law Review, Vol. 29, Page 387 (1987).
+ Jeffries, Legality, Vagueness, and the Construction of Penal Statutes, Virginia Law Review, Vol. 71, page 189 (1985).

Mens Rea
+ Westen, The Significance of Transferred Intent, Criminal Law and Philosophy, Vol. 7, page 321 (2013).
+ Slobogin, Experts, Mental States, and Acts, Seton Hall Law Review,  Vol. 38, page 1009 (2008).
+ Hamdani, Mens Rea and the Cost of Ignorance, Virginia Law Review, Vol. 93, No. 2, page 415 (2007).  
+ Simons, Should the Model Penal Code's Mens Rea Provisions Be Amended?, Ohio State Criminal Law Journal,
Vol. 1, page 179 (2003).
+ Batey, Exploitation of Mens Rea Confusion, At Common Law and Under the Model Penal Code, Georgia State University Law Review , Vol. 18, page 341 (2001).
+ Singer, The Model Penal Code and Three Two (and Possibly Only One) Ways Courts Avoid Mens Rea, Buffalo Criminal Law Review, Vol.4, page 139 (2000).
+ Diamond, The Crisis in the Ideology of Crime, Indiana Law Review, Vol. 31, page 291 (1998). 
+ Dillof, Transferred Intent: An Inquiry into the Nature of Criminal Culpability, Buffalo Criminal Law Review, Vol 1, page 501 (1998).
+ Garfield, A More Principled Approach to Criminalizing Negligence: A Prescription for the Legislature, Tennessee Law Review, Vol. 65, page 875 (1998).
+ Simmons, When Is Strict Liability Just?, Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, Vol. 87, page 1075 (1997).
+ Diamond, The Myth of Morality and Fault in Criminal Law, American Criminal Law Review, Vol. 34, page 111 (1996).
+ Simons, Rethinking Mental States, Boston University Law Review, Vol. 72, page 463 (1992).  
+ Husak, Transferred Intent, Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy, Vol.10, page 65 (1965).
+ Gardner, The Mens Rea Enigma: Observations on the Role of Motive in the Criminal Law Past and Present, 1993 Utah Law Review, page 635.
+ Williams, The Unresolved Problem of Recklessness, Legal Studies, Vol. 8, page 74 (1988).
+ Roth, The Felony-Murder Rule: A Doctrine at Constitutional Crossroads, Cornell Law Review, Vol. 70, page 446 (1985).
+ Moore, Responsibility and the Unconscious, Southern California Law Review, Vol. 53, page 1563 (1980).
+ Fletcher, The Theory of Criminal Negligence: A Comparative Analysis, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Vol. 119, pages 401 (1971).
+ Hall, Negligent Behavior Should Be Excluded From Penal Liability, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 63, page 662 (1963).
+ Wasserstrom, Strict Liability in the Criminal Law, Stanford Law Review,  Vol. 12, page 731 (1960).
+Sayre, Mens Rea, Harvard Law Review, Vol. 45, page 974 (1932).
+ Perkins, A Rationale of Mens Rea, Harvard Law Review, Vol. 52, page 905 (1939).
+ Perkins, Malice Aforethought, Yale Law Journal, Vol. 43, page 537 (1934).

Wilful (Willful) Blindness - Contrived Ignorance - The Ostrich (or Head-in-the-Sand) Defense
+ Ninth Circuit Holds That Motive Is Not an Element of Willful Blindness, Harvard Law Review, Vol. 121, page 1245 (2008).
+ Taslitz, Willfully Blinded: On Date Rape and Self-Deception, Harvard Journal of Law & Gender, Vol. 28, page 381 (2005).
+ Luban, Contrived Ignorance, Georgetown Law Journal, Vol. 87, page 957 (1999).
+ Marcus, Model Penal Code Section 2.02(7) and Willful Blindness, Yale Law Journal, Vol. 102, page 2231 (1993).
+ Robbins, The Ostrich Instruction: Deliberate Ignorance as a Criminal Mens Rea, Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol. 81, page 191 (1990).
+ Tigar, "Wilfullfulness" and "Ignorance" in Federal Criminal Law, Cleveland State Law Review, Vol. 37, page 525 (1989).

Conduct - Act, Omission, Possession
+ Cahill, Attempt by Omission, Iowa Law Review, Vol. 94, page 1207 (2009).
+ Husak, Rethinking the Act Requirement, Cardozo Law Review, Vol. 28. page 2437 (2007).
+ Curenton, The Past, Present, and Future of 18 U.S.C. Sec. 4: An Exploration of the Federal Misprision of Felony Statute, Alabama Law Review, Vol. 55, page 183 (2003).
+ Denno, Crime and Consciousness: Science and Involuntary Acts, Minnesota Law Review, Vol. 87 page 269 (2002).
+ Dubber, Policing Possession: The War on Crime and the End of Criminal Law, Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol. 91, page 829 (2002).
+ Stacy, Acts, Omissions and the Necessity of Killing Innocents, American Journal of Criminal Law, Vol.29, page 481 (2002).
+ Thompson, The White-Collar Police Force: "Duty to Report" Statutes in Criminal Law Theory, William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal, Vol. 11, page 3 (2002).
+ Smith, Legal Liability and Criminal Omission, Buffalo Criminal Law Review, Vol. 5, page 69 (2001).
+ Murphy, Beneficence, Law, and Liberty: The Case of Required Rescue, Georgetown Law Journal, Vol. 89, page 605 (2001).
+ Dressler, Some Brief Thoughts (Mostly Negative) About "Bad Samaritan" Laws, Santa Clara Law Review, Vol. 40, page 971 (2000).
+ Simester, On the So-Called Requirement for Voluntary Action, Buffalo Criminal Law Review, Vol. 1, page 403 (1998).
+ Fletcher, On the Moral Irrelevance of Bodily Movements, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Vol. 142, page 1443 (1994)
+ Yeager, A Radical Community of Aid: A Rejoinder to Opponents of Affirmative Duties to Help Strangers, Washington University Law Quarterly, Vol. 71, page 1 (1993).
+ Corrado, Automatism and the Theory of Action, Emory Law Journal, Vol. 39, page 1191 (1990).
+ Sirkin,The Evanescent Actus Reus Requirement, Southwestern University Law Review, Vol. 19, page 165 (1990).
+ Leavens, A Causation Approach to Criminal Omissions, California Law Review, Vol. 76, pages 547 (1988).
+ Saunders, Voluntary Acts and the Criminal Law: Justifying Culpability Based on the Existence of Volition, University of Pittsburgh Law Review, Vol. 49, page 433 (1988).
+  Smith, Liability for Omission in Criminal Law, Legal Studies, Vol. 14, page 88 (1984).
+ Keisel, Who Saw This Happen - States Move to Make Crime Bystanders Responsible, American Bar Association Journal, Vol. 69, page 1208 (1983).
+ Hughes, Criminal Omissions, Yale Law Journal, Vol. 67, page 590 (1958).

Causation 
+ Moore, The Metaphysics of Causal Intervention, California Law Review, Vol. 88, page 827 (2000).
+ Morse, The Moral Metaphysics of Causation and Results, California Law Review, Vol. 88, page 879 (2000).
+ Robertson, Respect for Life in Bioethical Dilemmas, Cleveland State Law Review, Vol. 45, page 329 (1997).
+ Kadish, Letting Patients Die: Legal and Moral Reflections, California Law Review, Vol. 80, page 857 (1992).
+ Leavens, A Causation Approach to Criminal Omissions, California Law Review, Vol. 76, page 547 (1988).
+ Terry, Homicide: The Viability of the Year and a Day Murder Rule, Howard Law Journal, Vol. 31. page 401(1988).

Complicity - Natural and Probable Consequences Rule &  Pinkerton Rule
+ Dressler, Reforming Complicity Law: Trivial Assistance as a Lesser Offense?, Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 5, page 427 (2008).
+ Bird, The Natural and Probable Consequences Doctrine: "Your Acts Are My Acts!," Western State University Law Review, Vol. 34, page 43 (2006).
+ Noferi, Towards Attenuation: A "New" Due Process Limit on Pinkerton Conspiracy Liability, American Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 33, No. 2,page 91 (2006).
+ Weisberg, Reappraising Complicity, Buffalo Criminal Law Review, Vol. 4, page 217 (2000).
+ Kadish, Reckless Complicity, Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol. 87, page 369 (1997).
+ Yeager, Helping, Doing, and the Grammar of Complicity, Criminal Justice Ethics, Vol. 15, page 25 (1996).
+ Robbins, Double Inchoate Crimes, Harvard Journal on Legislation, Vol. 26, page 1 (1989).
+ Dressler, Reassessing the Theoretical Underpinnings of Accomplice Liability: New Solutions to an Old Problem, Hastings Law Journal, Vol. 37, page 91 (1985).
+ Kadish, Complicity, Cause and Blame,: A Study in the Interpretation of Doctrine, California Law Review, Vol. 73, page 323 (1985).
+ Robinson, Imputed Criminal Liability, Yale Law Journal, Vol. 93,  page 609 (1984).
+ Perkins, Parties to Crimes, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Vol. 89, page 581 (1941).

White Collar Crime - Corporate or Enterprise Criminal Liability
+ Busey, Corporate Criminal Liability - When Does It Make Sense, American Criminal Law Review, Vol. 46, page 1437 (2009).
+ Podgor, White Collar Crime: A Letter from the Future, Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 5, No. 1, page 247 (2007).
+ Green, Moral Ambiguity in White Collar Criminal Law,  Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics, and Public Policy, Vol. 18, page 501 (2004).
+ Brown, New Federalism's Unanswered Question: Who Should Prosecute State and Local Officials For Political Corruption, Washington & Lee Law Review, Vol. 60, page 417 (2003).
+ Malloy, Regulation, Compliance and the Firm, Temple Law Review, Vol. 76, page 451 (2003).
+ Moohr, An Enron Lesson: The Modest Role of Criminal Law in Preventing Corporate Crime, Florida Law Review, Vol. 55, No. 4, page 937 (2003).
+ Survey of White Collar Crime, American Criminal Law Review, Vol. 40, No. 2 (2003).
+ Geraghty, Corporate Criminal Liability, American Criminal Law Review, Vol. 39, page 327 ( 2002).
+ Brown, The Corporate Director's Compliance Oversight Responsibility in Post Caremark Era, The Delaware Journal of Corporate Law, Vol. 26, page 1 (2001).
+ Lederman, Models for Imposing Corporate Criminal Liability: From Adaptation and Imitation Toward Aggregation and the Search for Self-Identity, Buffalo Criminal Law Review, Vol. 4, page 641 (2000).
+ Strader, The Judicial Politics of White Collar Crime, Hastings Law Journal, Vol. 50, page 1199 (1999).
+ Khanna, Corporate Criminal Liability: What Purpose Does It Serve? Harvard Law Review, Vol. 109, page 1477 (1996)
+ Arlen, The Potentially Perverse Effects of Corporate Criminal Liability, Journal of Legal Studies, Vol. 23, page 833 (1994)
+ Bucy, Corporate Ethos: A Standard for Imposing Corporate Criminal Liability, Minnesota Law Review, Vol. 75, page 1095 (1991).
+ Saltzburg, The Control of Criminal Conduct in Organizations, Boston University Law Review, Vol. 71, page 421 (1991).
+ Brickey, Rethinking Corporate Criminal Liability Under the Model Penal Code, Rutgers Law Journal, Vol. 19, page 593 (1988).
+ Fisse, Reconstructing Corporate Criminal Law: Deterrence, Retribution, Fault, and Sanctions, Southern California Law Review, Vol. 56, page 1141 (1983).
+ Coffee, "No Soul to Damn: No Body to Kick": An Unscandalized Inquiry Into the Problem of Corporate Punishment, Michigan Law Review, Vol. 79, page 386 (1981).
+ Posner, Optimal Sentence for White-Collar Criminal, 17 American Criminal Law Review, Vol. 17, page 409 (1980).
+ White Collar (Federal) Crime - (1), (2).

Inchoate Crimes
+ Cahil, Attempt, Reckless Homicide, and the Design of Criminal Law, University of Colorado Law Review, Vol. 78, page 879 (2007)
+ Morse, Reason, Results and Criminal Responsibility, University of Illinois Law Review, page 363 (2004)
+ Alexander, Mens Rea and Inchoate Crimes, Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol. 87, page 1138 (1997).
+ Crocker, Justice in Criminal Liability: Decriminalizing Harmless Attempts, Ohio State Law Journal, Vol. 53,  page 1057 (1992).
+ Ashworth, Criminal Attempts and the Role of the Resulting Harm Under the Code and in the Common Law, Rutgers Law Journal, Vol. 19, page 725 (1988).
+ Keedy, Criminal Attempts at Common Law, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Vol. 102, page  464 (1954).

Attempt and the Impossibility and Renunciation (Abandonment) Defenses
+ Cahill, Attempt by Omission, Iowa Law Review, Vol. 94, page 1207 (2009).
+ Westen, Impossibility Attempts: A Speculative Thesis, Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 5, page 523 (2008).
+ Cahill, Attempt, Reckless Homicide, and the Design of Criminal Law, University of Colorado Law Review, Vol. 78, page 879 (2007).
+ Batey, Minority Report and the Law of Criminal Attempt, Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 1, page 689 (2004). (1)
+ Christopher, Does Attempted Murder Deserve Greater Punishment Than Murder? Moral Luck and the Duty to Prevent Harm, Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy, Vol. 18, page 419 (2004).
+ Blumoff, A Jurisprudence for Punishing Attempts Asymmetrically, Buffalo Criminal Law Review, Vol. 6, page 951 (2003).
+ Hasnas, Once More Unto the Breach: The Inherent Liberalism of the Criminal Law and the Liability for Attempting the Impossible,  Hastings Law Journal, Vol. 54,  page 1 (2002).
+ Zimmerman, Attempted Stalking: An Attempt-to-Almost-Attempt-to-Act, Northern Illinois University Law Review, Vol. 20, page 219 (2000).
+ Alexander et al., Mens Rea and the Inchoate Crimes, Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol. 87, page 1138 (1997).
+ Lee, Canceling Crime, Connecticut Law Review, Vol. 30, page 117 (1997).
+ Feinberg, Equal Punishment for Failed Attempts; Some Bad But Instructive Arguments Against It, Arizona Law Review, Vol. 37, page 117 (1995).
+ Herman, Feinberg on Luck and Failed Attempts, Arizona Law Review, Vol. 37, page 143 (1995).
+ Husak, The Nature and Justifiability of Nonconsummate Offenses, Arizona Law Review, Vol. 37, page 151 (1995).
+ Crocker, Justice in Criminal Law: Decriminalizing Harmless Attempts, Ohio State Law Journal, Vol. 53, page 1058 (1992).
+ Simons, Mistake and Impossibility, Law and Fact, and Culpability: A Speculative Essay, Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol. 81, page 447 (1990).
+ Curriden, Voodoo Attempt? Two Face Charges in Failed Death Hex of Judge,  ABA Journal (September), page. 48 (1989).
+ Moriarity, Extending the Defense of Renunciation, Temple Law Review, Vol. 62, page 1 (1989).
+ Ashworth, Criminal Attempts and the Role of Resulting Harm Under the Code, and in Common Law, Rutgers Law Journal, Vol. 19, page 725 (1988).
+  Moriarty, Extending the Defense of Renunciation, Temple Law Review, Vol. 62, page 1 (1989).
+ Robbins, Double Inchoate Crimes, Harvard Journal on Legislation, Vol. 26, page 1 (1989)..
+ Ashworth, Criminal Attempts and the Role of Resulting Harm Under the Code, and in the Common Law, Rutgers Law Journal, Vol. 19, page 725 (1988).
+ Burkhardt, Is There a Rational Justification for  Punishing an Accomplished Crime More Severely Than an Attempted Crime?, Brigham Young University Law Review, Vol. 1986, page 553 (1986)
+ Hoeber, The Abandonment Defense to Criminal Attempt and Other Problems of Temporal Individuation, California Law Review, Vol. 74, page 377 (1986).
+ Robbins, Attempting the Impossible: The Emerging Consensus, Harvard Journal on Legislation, Vol. 23, page 377 (1986).
+ Weiss, Scope, Mistake, and Impossibility: The Philosophy of Language and Problems of Mens Rea, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 83, page 1029 (1983).
+ Kelman, Interpretive Construction in the Substantive Criminal Law, Stanford Law Review, Vol. 33, page 591 (1981).
+ Dutile et al., Mistake and Impossibility: Arranging a Marriage Between Two Difficult Partners, Northwestern University Law Review, Vol. 74, page 166 (1979).
+ Enker, Mens Rea and Criminal Attempt, American Bar Foundation Research Journal, page 845 (1977).
+ Weigend, Why Lady Eldon Should Be Acquitted: The Social Harm in Attempting the Impossible, DePaul Law Review, Vol. 27, page 231 (1977).
+ Meehan, Attempt--Some Rational Thought on its Rationale" Criminal Law Quarterly, Vol. 19, page 215 (1976).
+ Enker, Impossibility in Criminal Attempts - Legality and the Legal Process, Minnesota Law Review, Vol. 53, page 665 (1969).
+ Stuart, Mens Rea, Negligence, and Attempts, 1968 Criminal Law Review, page 647 (1968).
+ Hughes, One Further Footnote on Attempting the Impossible, New York University Law Review, Vol. 42, page 1005 (1967).
+ Wechsler, The Treatment of Inchoate Crimes in the Model Penal Code of the American Law Institute: Attempt, Solicitation and Conspiracy, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 61, page 571 (1961).
+ Perkins, Criminal Attempt and Related Problems, UCLA Law Review, Vol. 2, page 319 (1955).
+ Sayre, Criminal Attempts, Harvard Law Review, Vol. 41, page 821 (1928).
+ Beale, Criminal Attempts, Harvard Law Review, Vol. 16, page 491 (1903).

Conspiracy
+ Davis et al., Federal Criminal Conspiracy, American Criminal Law Review, Vol. 44, page 523 (2007).
+ Ohlin, Group Think: The Law of Conspiracy and Collective Reason, Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology. Vol. 98, page 147 (2007).
+ Rosenberg, Several Problems in Criminal Conspiracy Laws and Some Proposals for Reform, Criminal Law Bulletin, Vol. 43, No. 4, page 427 (2007).
+ Katyl, Conspiracy Theory, Yale Law Journal, Vol. 112, No 6, page 1307 (2003).
+ Cohan, Seditious Conspiracy, The Smith Act, and Prosecution for Religious Speech Advocating the Violent Overthrow of Government, St. John's Journal of Legal Commentary, Vol. 17, Issue 2, page 199 (2003).
+ Imwinkelreid. Prejudice to the Nth Degree: The Introduction of Uncharged Misconduct Admissible Only Against a Co-Defendant at a Megatrial, Oklahoma Law Review, Vol. 53, page 35 (2000).
+ Alexander et al, Mens Rea and Inchoate Crimes, Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol. 87, page 1138 (1997)
+ Genco, What Happened to Durland?: Mail Fraud, RICO, and Justifiable Reliance, Notre Dame Law Review, Vol. 68, page 333 (1992).
+ Marcus, Criminal Conspiracy: Time to Turn Back from an Ever Expanding, Ever More Troubling Area, William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal, Vol. 1, page 1 (1992).
+ Lynch, A Conceptual, Practical, and Political Guide to RICO Reform, Vanderbilt Law Review, Vol. 43, page 769 (1990).
+ Robbins, Double Inchoate Crimes, Harvard Journal on Legislation, Vol 26, page 1 (1989).
+ Lynch, RICO: The Crime of Being a Criminal, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 87, page 920 (1987).
+ Blakey et al.,Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO): Basic Concepts - Criminal and Civil Remedies, Temple Law Quarterly, Vol 53, page 1009 (1980).
+ Buscemi, Conspiracy: Statutory Reform Since the Model Penal Code, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 75, page 1122 (1975).
+ Johnson, The Unnecessary Crime of Conspiracy, California Law Review, Vol. 61, page 1137 (1973).
+ Goldstein, Conspiracy to Defraud the United States, Yale Law Journal, Vol. 68, page 405 (1959).
+ Harno, Intent in Criminal Conspiracy, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Vol. 89, page  624 (1941).

Solicitation
+ Curran, Solicitation: A Substantive Crime, Minnesota Law Review, Vol. 17, page 499 (1933).

Murder
+ Crump, "Murder Pennsylvania Style": Comparing Traditional American Homicide Law to the Statutes of the Model Penal Code, West Virginia Law Review, Vol. 109, page 257 (2007).
+ Duffy, Reality Check: How Practical Circumstances Affect the Interpretation of Depraved Indifference Murder, Duke Law Journal, Vol. 57, No. 2, page 425 (2007).
+ Cohne-Almagor, Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide in the Democratic World: A legal Overview, New York International Law Review, Vol. 16, page 1 (2003).
+ Kamisar, Physician-Assisted Suicide: The Problems Presented by the Compelling, Heartwrenching Case, Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, Vol. 88, page 1121 (1998).
+ Robertson, Respect for Life in Bioethical Dilemmas, Cleveland State Law Review, Vol. 45, page 329 (1997).
+ Oberman, Mothers Who Kill: Coming to Terms with Modern American Infanticide, American Criminal Law Review, Vol. 34, page 1 (1996).
+ Newman, Euthanasia: Orchestrating, "The Last Syllable of ...Time," University of Pittsburgh Law Review, Vol. 53, page 153 (1991).
+ Pillsbury, Evil and the Law of Murder, University of California at Davis Law Review, Vol. 24, page 437 (1990).
+ Peters, The State's Interest in the Preservation of Life: From Quinlan to Cruzan, Ohio State Law Journal, Vol. 50, page 891 (1989).
+ Michaels, Defining Unintended Murder, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 85, page 786 (1985).
+ Kamisar, Some Non-Religious Views Against Proposed "Mercy-Killing" Legislation, Minnesota Law Review, Vol. 42, page 969 (1958).
+ Williams, "Mercy Killing" Legislation: A Rejoinder, Minnesota Law Review, Vol. 43, page 1 (1958).
+ Michael & Wechsler, A Rationale of the Law of Homicide, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 37, page 701 (1937).

Felony Murder
+  Binder, The Culpability of the Felony Murder, Notre Dame Law Review, Vol.83, page 965 (2008).
+ Birdsong, The Felony Murder Doctrine Revisited: A Proposal for Calibrating Punishment that Reaffirms the Sanctity of Human Life of Co-Felons Who Are Victims, Ohio Northern University Law Review, Vol. 33, page 497 (2007).
+ Binder, The Origins of American Felony Murder Rules, Stanford Law Review, Vol. 57, page 59 (2004).
+ Cole, Expanding Felony-Murder in Ohio: Felony-Murder or Murder Felony?, Ohio State Law Journal, Vol. 63, page 15 (2002).
+ Binder, Felony Murder and Mens Rea Default Rules: A Study in Statutory Interpretation, Buffalo Criminal Law Review, Vol. 4, page 399 (2000).
+ Tomkovicz, The Endurance of the Felony-Murder Rule: A Study of the Forces That Shape Our Criminal Law, Washington & Lee Law Review, Vol. 51, page 1429 (1994).
+ Finkel, Capital Felony-Murder, Objective Indicia, and Community Sentiment, Arizona Law Review, Vol. 32, page 819 (1990).
+ Crump et al., In Defense of the Felony-Murder Doctrine, Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy, Volume 8, page 359 (1985).
+ Roth et al., The Felony-Murder Rule: A Doctrine at Constitutional Crossroads, Cornell Law Review, Vol. 70, page 446 (1985).
+ Fletcher, Reflections of Felony-Murder, Southwestern University Law Review, Vol. 12, page 413 (1981).

Manslaughter
+ Bennardo, Kevin, Of Ordinariness and Excuse: Heat-of-Passion and the Seven Deadly Sins, Capital Law Review, Vol. 6, page 675 (2008).
+ Garvey, What's Wrong with Involuntary Manslaughter?, Texas Law Review, Vol. 85, page 333 (2006).
+ Dressler, Why Keep the Provocation Defense?: Some Reflections on a Difficult Subject, Minnesota Law Review, Vol. 86, page 959 (2002).
+ Dressler, When "Heterosexual" Men Kill "Homosexual" Men: Reflections on Provocation Law, Sexual Advances, and the "Reasonable Man" Standard, Jourrnal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol. 85, page 726 (1995).
+ Dressler, Rethinking Heat of Passion: A Defense in Search of a Rationale, Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol. 73, page 421 (1982).
+ Brett,The Physiology of Provocation, Criminal Law Review, Vol.1970, page 634 (1970)

Assault
+ Shen, Mind, Body and the Criminal Law, Minnesota Law Review, Vol. 97, page 2036 (2013)
+ Harary, Aggressive Play or Criminal Assault? An In Depth Look at Sports Violence and Criminal Liability, Columbia Journal of Law and the Arts, Vol. 25, page 197 (2002).
+ Clarke, Law and Order on the Courts: The Application of Criminal Liability for Intentional Fouls During Sporting Events, Arizona State Law Journal, Vol. 32, page 1149 (2000).
+ Karon, Winning Isn't Everything, It's the Only Thing: The Need for Federal Regulation and Criminal Sanctions, Indiana Law Review, Vol. 25, page 147 (1991).
+ Perkins, An Analysis of Assault and Attempts to Assault, Minnesota Law Review, Vol. 47, page 71 (1962).

Kidnapping
+ Diamond, Kidnapping: A Modern Definition, American Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 13, page 1 (1985).

Hate Crimes 
+ Parks et al., "Nigger": A Critical Race Realist Analysis of the N-Word Within Hate Crimes Law, Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol. 98, No. 4, page 1305 (2008).
+ Abrams, Fighting Fire with Fire: Rethinking the Role of Disgust in Hate Crimes, California Law Review, Vol. 90  (2002).

Rape
+ Bandes, Child Rape, Moral Outrage, and the Death Penalty, Northwestern University Law Review, Vol. 103, page 17  (2008).
+ Duncan, Sex Crimes and Sexual Miscues: The Need for a Clear Line Between Forcible Rape and Nonconsensual Sex, Wake Forest Law Review, Vol. 42, No. 4, page 1087 (2007).
+ Carpenter, The Constitutionality of Strict Liability in Sex Offender Registration Laws, Boston University Law Review, Vol. 86, page 295 (2006).
+ Hogan, The False Dichotomy of Rape Trauma Syndrome, Cardozo J.L. & Gender. Vol. 12, page 529 (2006).
+ Sigler, By the Light of Virtue: Prison Rape and the Corruption of Character, Iowa Law Review, Vol. 91, page 521 (2006).
+ Anderson, Negotiating Sex, Southern California Law Review, Vol. 78, page 1401 (2005).
+ Haddad, Shield or Sieve? People v. Bryant and the Rape Shield Law in High-Profile Cases, Columbia Journal of Law and Social Problems, Vol. 39, page 185 (2005).
+ Loewy, Rape in a Post Lawrence v. Texas World, SMU Law Review, Vol. 58, page 77 (2005).
+ Anderson, The Legacy of the Prompt Complaint Requirement, Corroboration Requirement, and Cautionary Instructions on Campus Sexual Assault, Boston University Law Review, Vol. 84, page 945 (2004).
+ Fuchs, Male Sexual Assault: Issues of Arousal and Consent, Cleveland State Law Review, Vol. 51 , page 93 (2004). 
+ Westen, Some Common Confusions About Consent in Rape Cases, Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 2, No. 1, page 332 (2004).
+ Anderson, Marital Immunity, Intimate Relationships, and Improper Inferences: A New Law on Sexual Offenses by Intimates, Hastings Law Journal, Vol. 54, page 1465 (2003).
+ Carpenter, On Statutory Rape, Strict Liability and the Public Welfare Models, American University Law Review, Vol. 53, page 313 (2003). 
+ Denno, Why the Model Penal Code's Sexual Assault Provisions Should Be Pulled and Replaced, Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 1, page 207 (2003).
+ Fisher, Unraveling the Fear of Victimization Among College Women: Is the "Shadow of Sexual Assault Hypothesis" Supported?, Justice Quarterly, Vol. 20, page 633 (2003).
+ Futter et al., The Effects of Rape Law Reform on Rape Case Processing, Berkeley Women's Law Journal (now Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law & Justice), Vol. 16, page 72 (2001).
+ Hoeffel, The Gender Gap: Revealing Inequities in Admission of Social Science Evidence in Criminal Cases, University of Arkansas Law Review, Vol. 24, page 41 (2001).
+ Kinports, Rape and Force: The Forgotten Mens Rea, Buffalo Criminal Law Review, Vol. 4, page 755 (2001)
+  Dryden, Redefining Rape, Buffalo Criminal Law Review, Vol. 3, page 317 (2000).
+ Garrison, Rape Trauma Syndrome: A Review of a Behavioral Science Theory and Its Admissibility in Criminal Trials, American Journal of Trial Advocacy, Vol. 23, page 591 (2000).
+ Hasday, Contest and Consent, A Legal History of Marital Rape, California Law Review, Vol. 88, page 1373 (2000).
+ Jones, Sex, Culture, and the Biology of Rape: Toward Explanation and Prevention, California Law Review, Vol. 87, page 827 (1999).
+ Anderson, Reviving Resistance in Rape Law, University of Illinois Law Review, Vol. 1998, page 953 (1998).
+ Falk, Rape by Fraud and Rape by Coercion, Brooklyn Law Review, Vol. 64, page 39 (1998).
+ Bryden et al., Rape in the Criminal Justice System, Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, Vol. 87, page 1194 (1997).
+ Baker, Once a Rapist? Motivational Evidence and Relevancy in Rape Law, Harvard Law Review, Vol. 110, page 563 (1997).
+ Larson, "Even a Worm Will Turn at Last": Rape Reform in Late Nineteenth-Century America, Yale Journal of Law and the Humanities, Vol. 9, page 1 (1997).
+ Cavallaro, A Big Mistake: Eroding the Defense of Mistake of Fact About Consent in Rape, Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol. 86, page 815 (1996).
+ Spohn et al., The Impact of Rape Law Reform on the Processing of Simple and Aggravated Rape Cases, Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, Vol. 86, page 861 (1996).
+ Tazlitz, Patriarchal Stories I: Cultural Rape Narratives in the Courtroom, Southern California Review of Law and Women's Studies, Vol. 5, page 387 (1996).
+ Maguigan, Cultural Evidence and Male Violence: Are Feminist and Multicultural Reformers on a Collision Course in Criminal Courts?, New York University Law Review, Vol. 70, page 36 (1995).
+ Scalo, What Does "No" Mean in Pennsylvania? - The Pennsylvania Supreme Court's Interpretation of Rape and the Effectiveness of the Legislature's Response, Villanova Law Review, Vol. 40, page 193 (1995).
+ Siegel, The Marital Rape Exemption: Evolution to Extinction, Cleveland State Law Review, Vol. 43, page 351 (1995).
+ Bachman & Paternoster, A Contemporary Look at the Effects of Rape Law Reform : How Far Have We Really Come?, Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol. 84, page 554 (1993).
+ Remick, Read her Lips: An Argument for a Verbal Consent Standard in Rape, University of Pennsylvania Law review, Vol. 141, page 1103 (1993).
+ Roberts, Rape, Violence, and Women's Autonomy, Chicago-Kent Law Review, Vol. 69, page 359 (1993).
+ Schafran, Writing and Reading About Rape: A Primer, St. Johns Law Review, Vol. 66, page 981 (1993).
+ Sitton, Old Wine in New Bottles: The "Marital" Rape Allowance, North Carolina Law Review, Vol. 72, page 261 (1993).
+ West, Legitimating  the Illegitimate: A Comment on Beyond Rape, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 93, page 1142 (1993).
+ Dripps, Beyond Rape: An Essay on the Difference Between the Presence of Force and the Absence of Consent, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 92, page 1780 (1992).
+ Henderson, Rape and Responsibility, Law & Philosophy, Vol. 11, page 127 (1992).
+ Schulhofer, Taking Sexual Autonomy Seriously: Rape Law and Beyond, Law and Philosophy, Vol. 11, page 35 (1992).
+ Berliner, Rethinking the Reasonable Belief Defense to Rape, 100 Yale L. J. 2687 (1991).
+ Estrich, Sex at Work, Stanford Law Review, Vol. 43, page 813 (1991).
+ Torrey, When Will We Be Believed? Rape Myths and the Idea of a Fair Trial in Rape Prosecutions, Vol. 24, University of California at Davis Law Review, Vol. 24, page 1013 (1991).
+ Estrich, Defending Women, Michigan Law Review, Vol. 88, page 1430 (1990).
+ West, Equality Theory, Marital Rape, and the Promise of the Fourteenth Amendment, University of Florida Law Review, Vol. 42, page 45 (1990).
+ Berger, Review Essay - Not So Simple Rape, Criminal Justice Ethics, Vol. 7, page 69 (1988).
+ Wicktom, Focusing on the Offender's Forceful Conduct: A Proposal for the Redefinition of Rape Laws, George Washington Law Review, Vol. 56, page 399 (1988).
+ Estrich, Rape, Yale Law Journal, Vol. 95, page 1087 (1986).
+ Galvin, Shielding Rape Victims in the State and Federal Courts: A Proposal for the Second Decade, Minnesota Law Review, Vol. 70, page 763 (1986).
+ To Have to Hold: The Marital Rape Exemption and the Fourteenth Amendment, Harvard Law Review, Vol. 99, page 1255 (1986).
+ Massaro, Experts, Psychology, Credibility, and Rape: The Rape Trauma Syndrome Issue and Its Implications for Expert Psychological Testimony, Minnesota Law Review, Vol. 69, page 395 (1985).
+ McCord, The Admissibility of Expert Testimony Regarding Rape Trauma Syndrome in Rape Prosecutions, Boston College Law Review, Vol. 26, page 1143 (1985).
+ Olsen, Statutory Rape: A Feminist Critique of Rights Analysis, Texas Law Review, Vol. 63, page 387 (1984).  
+ Weiner, Shifting the Communication Burden: A Meaningful Consent Standard in Rape, Harvard Women's Law Journal, Vol. 6, page 143 (1983).
+ Wiggins, Rape, Racism and the Law, Harvard Women's Law Journal, Vol. 6, page 103 (1983).
+ Sorrel & Masters, Sexual Molestation of Men by Women, Archives of Sexual Behavior, Vol. 11, No.2, page 117 (1982).
+ Burt, Cultural Myths and Supports for Rape, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 38, page 217 (1980).
+ Harris, Towards a Consent Standard in the Law of Rape, University of Chicago Law Review, Vol. 43, page 613 (1976).
+ Burgess et al., Rape Trauma Syndrome, American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 131, page 981 (1974).
+ Legrand, Rape and Rape Laws: Sexism in Society and Law, California Law Review, Vol. 61, page 919 (1973).

Date (Acquaintance) Rape
+ Pillsbury, Crimes Against the Heart, Loyola of Los Angeles Law Review, Vol. 35, No. 3 (2002).
+ Husak, Date Rape, Social Convention and Reasonable Mistakes, Law and Philosophy, Vol. 11, page 95 (1992).
+ Balos & Fellows, Guilty of the Crime of Trust: Nonstranger Rape, Minnesota Law Review, Vol 75, page 599 (1991).
+ Koss, et al., Nonstranger Sexual Aggression: A Discriminant Analysis of the Psychological Characteristics of Undetected Offenders, Sex Roles, Vol. 12, page 981 (1985).

Statutory Rape (Sexual Assault of a Child)
+ Higdon, Queer Teens and Legislative Bullies: The Cruel and Invidious Discrimination Behind Heterosexist Statutory Rape Laws, UC Davis Law Review, Vol. 42, page 195 (2008).
+ Carpenter, On Statutory Rape, Strict Liability, and the Public Welfare Offense Model, American University Law Review, Vol. 53, No. 2, page 313 (2003).
+ Oberman, Regulating Consensual Sex with Minors: Defining a Role for Statutory Rape, Buffalo Law Review, Vol. 48, page 703 (2000).
+ Kitrosser, Meaningful Consent: Toward a New Generation of Statutory Rape Laws, Virginia Journal of Social Policy and the Law, Vol. 4, page 287 (1997).
+ Oberman, Turning Girls Into Women: Re-Evaluating Modern Statutory Rape Law, Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, Vol. 87, page 15 (1994).
+ Myers, et al, Expert Testimony in Child Sexual Abuse Litigation, Nebraska Law Review, Vol. 68, page 1 (1989).
+ Olsen, Statutory Rape: A Feminist Critique of Rights Analysis, Texas Law Review, Vol. 63, page 387 (1984).

Burglary
+ Anderson, From the Thief in the Night to the Guest Who Stayed Too Long: The Evolution of Burglary in the Shadow of the Common Law, Indiana Law Review, Vol. 45, page 629 (2012).

(Larceny)
+ Green, Looting, Law, and Lawlessness, Tulane Law Review, Vol. 81, Page 1129 (2007).
+ Solove, Identity Theft, Privacy, and the Architecture of Vulnerability, Hastings Law Journal, Vol. 54, page 1227 (2003).
+ Tigar, The Right of Property and the Law of Theft, Texas Law Review, Vol. 62, page 1143 (1994).
+ Posner, An Economic Theory of Criminal Law, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 85, Page 1193 (1985).
+ Williams, Temporary Appropriation Should Be Theft, Vol. 1981, page 129 (1981).
+ Fletcher, The Metamorphosis of Larceny, Harvard Law Review, Vol. 89, page 469 (1976).
+ Calabresi et al., Property Rules, Liability Rules and Inalienability: One View of the Cathedral, Harvard Law Review, Vol. 85, page 1089 (1972).
+ Beale, The Borderland of Larceny, Harvard Law Review, Vol. 6, page 244 (1892).

Embezzlement
+ Pogrebin et al., Stealing Money: An Assessment of Bank Embezzlers, Behavioral Science & Law, Vol. 4, page 481 (1986).

False Pretenses
+ Pearce, Theft by False Promises, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Vol. 101, page 967 (1953).

Extortion (Blackmail)
+ Westen, Why the Paradox of Blackmail Is So Hard to Resolve, Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 9, page 585 ( 2012).
+ Robinson et al, Competing Theories of Blackmail: An Empirical Research Critique of Criminal Law Theory, University of Texas Law Review, Vol. 89, page 291 (2010).
+ Berman: The Evidentiary Theory of Blackmail: Taking Motives Seriously, University of Chicago Law Review, Vol. 65, page 795 (1998).
+ Fletcher, Blackmail: The Paradigmatic Crime, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Vol. 141, page 1617 (1993).
+ Ginsburg, Blackmail: An Economic Analysis of Law, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Vol. 141, page 1873 (1993).
+ Lindgren, The Theory, History, and Practice of the Bribery -Extortion Distinction, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Vol. 141, page 1695 (1993).
+ Lindgren, The Elusive Distinction Between Bribery and Extortion: From the Common Law to the Hobbs Act, UCLA Law Review, Vol. 35, page 815 (1988).
+  Block et al., Blackmail, Extortion and Free Speech: A Reply to Posner, Epstein, Nozick and Lindgren, Loyola of Los Angeles Law Review, Vol. 19, page 37 (1985).
+ Lindgren, Unraveling the Paradox of Blackmail, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 84, page 670 ( 1984).
+ Lindgren, More Blackmail Ink: A Critique of Blackmail, Inc., Epstein's Theory of Blackmail, Connecticut Law Review, Vol. 16, page 909 (1984).
+ Epstein, Blackmail, Inc., University of Chicago Law Review , Vol. 50, page 553 (1983).
+ Ruff, Federal Prosecution of Local Corruption: A Case Study in the Making of Law Enforcement Policy, Georgetown Law Journal, Vol 65, page 1171 (1977).

Information Theft
+ Dmitrieva, Stealing Information: Application of a Criminal Anti-Theft Statute to Leaks of Confidential Government Information, Florida Law Review, Vol. 55, No. 4, page 1043 (2003).

Computer Crime (Cybercrime)
+ Kerr, Cybercrimes's Scope: Interpreting "Access" and "Authorization" In Computer Misuse Statutes, New York University Law Review, Vol. 78, page 1596 (2003).
+ Wiest, The Netsurfing Split:Restrictions Imposed on Internet and Computer Usage by Those Convicted of a Crime Involving a Computer, Cincinnati Law Review, Vol. 72, page 847 (2003). 
+ Jacobson, Computer Crimes, American Criminal Law Review, Vol. 39, page 273 (2002).
+ Katyal, Criminal Law in Cyberspace, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Vol. 149, page 1003 (2001).

Criminal Fraud
+ Moohr, Federal Criminal Fraud and the Development of Intangible Property Rights in Information, 2000 University of Illinois Law Review 683.
+ Podgor, Criminal Fraud, American Law Review Vol. 48, No. 4, page 1 (1999).
+ Henning, Maybe It Should Just Be Called Federal Fraud: The Changing Nature of the Mail Fraud Statute, Boston College Law Review, Vol. 36, page 435 (1995).
+ Podgor, Mail Fraud:Opening Letters, South Carolina Law Review, Vol. 43, page 223 (1992)
+ Rakoff, The Federal Mail Fraud Statute (Part I), Duquesne Law Review, Vol. 18, page 771 (1980).

Perjury
+ Green, Lying, Misleading, and Falsely Denying: How Moral Concepts Inform the Law of Perjury, Fraud, and False Statements, Hastings Law Journal, Vol. 53, page 157 (2001).

Prostitution
+ Franklin, Prostitution and Sex Workers, Georgetown Journal of Gender and the Law, Vol. 8, page 355 (2007).
+ Leigh, Sex Work Explored: Rethinking the Laws Regulating Prostitution, Georgetown Journal of Gender and the Law, Vol. 8, page 995 (2007).
+ Phoenix, Governing Prostitution: New Formations, Old Agendas, Wisconsin Law Review, page 73 (2007).
+ Streit, Birds of an Illegal Feather: Prostitution and Paid Pornography Should Be Criminalized Together, Cardozo Public Law, Policy and Ethics Journal, Vol. 5, page 729 (2007).
+ Farley, Prostitution, Trafficking and Cultural Amnesia: What We Must Not Know in Order to Keep the Business of Sexual Exploitation Running Smoothly, Yale Journal of Law and Feminism, Vol. 18, page 109 (2006).
+ Torgoley, Trafficking and Forced Prostitution: A Manifestation of Modern Slavery, Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law, Vol. 14, page 553 (2006).
+ Abrams, Polygamy, Prostitution and the Federalization of Immigration Law, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 105, page 641 (2005).
+ Larson, Prostitution, Labor and Human Rights, UC Davis Law Review, Vol. 37, page 673 (2004)
+ Becker, A Review of the Prostitution of Sexuality: The Global Exploitation of Women, De Paul Law Review, Vol. 52, page 1043 (2003).
+ Balos, Teaching Prostitution Seriously, New Criminal Law Review (Buffalo Criminal Law Review), Vol. 4, page 709 (2001)
+ Almodovar, For Their Own Good: The Results of the Prostitution Laws as Enforced by Cops, Politicians and Judges, Hastings Women's Law Journal, Vol. 10, page 119 (1999).
+ Baldwin, A Million Dollar and an Apology: Prostitution and Public Benefits Claims, Hastings Women's Law Journal, Vol. 10, page 189 (1999).
+ Bernstein, What's Wrong with Prostitution? What's Right with Sex Work? Comparing Markets in Female Sexual Labor, Hastings Women's Law Journal, Vol. 10, page 91 (1999).
+ Lefler, Shining the Spotlight on Johns: Moving Toward Equal Treatment of Male Customers and Female Prostitutes, Hastings Women's Law Journal, Vol. 10, page 11 (1999).
+ Drexler, Government's Role in Turning Tricks: The World's Oldest Profession in the Netherlands and the Untied States, Dickinson Journal of International Law, Vol. 15, page 201 (1996).
+ Baldwin, A Date with Justice: Prostitution and the Decriminalization Debate, Cardozo Women's Law Journal, Vol. 1, page 125 (1993).
+ Dworkin, Prostitution and Male Supremacy, Michigan Journal of Gender and Law, Vol. 1, page 1 (1993).
Hunter, Prostitution Is Cruelty and Abuse to Women and Children, Michigan Journal of Gender and Law, Vol. 1, page 91 (1993).
+ Leidholdt, Prostitution: A Violation of Women's Human Rights, Cardozo Women's Law Journal, Vol. 1, page 133 (1993).

Obscenity
+ Henkin, Morals and the Constitution: The Sin of Obscenity, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 63, page 391 (1963).

Pornography
+ Sunstein, Pornography and the First Amendment, Duke Law Journal, page 589 (1986).

Animal Fighting (1)
+ Coleman, Note to Athletes, NFL and NBA: Dog Fighting Is a Crime, Not a Sport, Journal of Animal Law & Ethics, Vol. 3, page 101 (2008).

Gun Control
+ Couch & Shughart, Crime, Gun Control, and BATF: The Political Economy of Law Enforcement, Fordham Urban Law Journal, Vol. XXX, No. 2, page 617 (2003).

Reasonable Doubt
+ Kane, Reasonable Doubt and Other Shibboleths, Litigation, Vol. 29, No. 1, pp. 22 (2002).
+ Corwin, Defining "Proof Beyond a Reasonable Doubt" for the Criminal Jury, Villanova Law Review, Vol. 46, page 829 (2001).
+ Solan, Refocusing the Burden of Proof in Criminal Cases: Some Doubt About Reasonable Doubt, Texas Law Review, Vol. 78, page 105 (1999).
+ Mulrine, Reasonable Doubt: How in the World Is If Defined?, American University Journal of International Law & Policy, Vol. 12, page 195 (1997).

Burden of Proof
Underwood, The Thumb on the Scales of Justice: Burdens of Persuasion in Criminal Cases, Yale Law Journal, Vol. 86, page 1299 (1977).

Defenses
+ Stone-Manista, Protecting Pregnant Women; A Guide to Successfully Challenging Criminal Child Abuse Prosecutions of Pregnant Drug Addicts, Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol.. 99, No. 3, page 823 (2009).
+ Nourse, Reconceptualizing Criminal Law Defenses, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Vol. 151, No. 5, page 1691 (2003).
+ Falk, Novel Theories of Criminal Defense Based Upon the Toxicity of the Social Environment: Urban Psychosis, Television, Intoxication, and Black Rage, North Carolina Law Review, Vol. 74, page 731 (1996).
+ Comment, Premenstrual Syndrome: The Debate Surrounding Criminal Defense, Maryland Law Review, Vol. 54, page 571 (1995).
+ Holtzman, Premenstrual Symptoms: No Legal Defense, St. Johns Law Review, Vol. 60, page 712 (1986).
+ Riley, Premenstrual Syndrome as a Legal Defense, Hamline Law Review, Vol. 9, page 193 (1986).
+ Delgado, "Rotten Social Background": Should the Criminal Law Recognize a Defense of Severe Environmental Deprivation?, Law and Inequality, Vol. 3, page 9 (1985).
+ Robinson, Criminal Law Defenses: A Systematic Analysis, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 82, page 199 (1982).
+ Jeffries, Defenses, Presumptions and Burdens of Proof in the Criminal Law, Yale Law Journal, Vol. 88, page 1325 (1979).

Justification and Excuse
+ Hruschka, Justification and Excuse: A Systematic Approach, Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 2, page 407 (2005).
+ Baron, Justifications and Excuses, Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 2, page 387 (2005).
+Milhizer, Justification and Excuse: What They Were, What They Are, and What They Ought to Be, St. John's Law Review, Vol.78, page 725 (2004).
+ Berman, Justification and Excuse, Law and Morality, Duke Law Journal, Vol. 53, No.1  (2003).
+ Dressler, Justifications and Excuses: A Brief Review of the Concepts and the Literature, Wayne Law Review, Vol. 33, page 1155 (1987).
+ Kadish, Excusing Crime, California Law Review, Vol. 75 , page 257 (1987).
+ Dressler, New Thoughts About the Concept of Justification in the Criminal Law: A Critique of Fletcher's Thinking and Rethinking, UCLA Law Review, Vol. 32, page 61 (1984).

Provocation
+ Symposium, The Nature, Structure, and Function of Heat of Passion/Provocation as a Criminal Defense, University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform, Vol. 43, Issue 1 (2009).
+ Kent, The Non-Violent Homosexual Advance Is Insufficient Evidence of Provocation, University of San Francisco Law Review, Vol. 44, page 155 (2009).
+ Bennardo, Of Ordinariness and Excuse: Heat -of-Passion and the Seven Deadly Sins, Capital University Law Review, Vol. 36, page 675 (2008).
+ Rozelle, Controlling Passion: Adultery and the Provocation Defense, 37 Rutgers Law Journal 197 (2005).
+ Garvey, Passion's Puzzle, Iowa Law Review, Vol. 90, page 1677 (2005)
+ Dressler, Why Keep the Provocation Defense? Some Reflections on a Difficult Subject, Minnesota Law Review, Vol. 86, page 959 (2002).    (Westlaw:  86 MNLR 959)
+ Miller, Womanslaughter: Voluntary Manslaughter, Gender, and the Model Penal Code, Emory Law Journal, Vol. 50, page 665 (2000).
+ Sing, Culture as Sameness: Toward a Synthetic View of Provocation and Culture in the Criminal Law, Yale Law Journal, Vol. 108, page 1845 (1999).
+ Nourse, Passion's Progress: Modern Law Reform and the Provocation Defense, Yale Law Journal, Vol. 106 , page 1331 (1997).
+ Dressler, When "Heterosexual" Men Kill "Homosexual" Men: Reflections on Provocation Law, Sexual Advances, and the "Reasonable Man" Standard, Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, Vol. 85, page 726 (1995).
+ Coker, Heat of Passion and Wife Killing: Men Who Batter/Men Who Kill, Southern California Review of Law & Women's Studies, Vol. 71, page 71 (1992).
+ Mison, Homophobia in Manslaughter: The Homosexual Advance as Insufficient Provocation, California Law Review, Vol. 80, page 133 (1992).
+ Taylor, Provoked Reason in Men and Women: Heat-of-Passion Manslaughter and Imperfect Self-Defense, UCLA Law Review, Vol. 33, page 1679 (1986)
+ Morse, Undiminished Confusion in Diminished Capacity, Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol. 75, page 1 (1984).
+ Dressler, Rethinking Heat of Passion: A Defense in Search of a Rationale, Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, Vol. 73, page 421 (1982).

Mistake of Law - Ignorance of Law
+ Gur-Arye, Reliance on a Lawyer's Mistaken Advice - Should it be an Excuse from Criminal Liability?, American Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 29, page 455 (2002).
+ Kahan, Ignorance of the Law is Excuse - But Only for the Virtuous, Michigan Law Review, Vol. 96, page 127 (1997).
+ White, Reliance on Apparent Authority as a Defense to Criminal Prosecutions, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 77, page 775 (1977).

Mistake of Fact and Impossibility
+ Garvey, When Should a Mistake of Fact Excuse?, Texas Tech Law Review, Vol. 42, page 359 (2009).
+ Cavallaro, A Big Mistake: Eroding the Defense of Mistake of Fact About Consent in Rape, 86 Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology 815 (1996).
+ Simons, Mistake and Impossibility, Law and Fact, and Culpability: A Speculative Essay, Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, Vol. 81, page 469 (1990).
+ Low, The Model Penal Code, the Common Law, and Mistakes of Fact: Recklessness, Negligence, or Strict Liability, Rutgers Law Journal, Vol. 19, page 539 (1988). 
+ Dutile & Moore, Mistake and Impossibility, Arranging a Marriage Between Two Difficult Partners, 74 Northwestern Law Review 166 (1979).

Intoxication  
+ Westin, Engelhoff Again, American Criminal Law Review, Vol. 36, page 1203 (1999).
+ Allen, Montana v. Engelhoff - Reflections on the Limits of Legislative Imagination and Judicial Authority, Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol. 87, page 633 (1997).
+ Keiter, Just Say No Excuse: The Rise and Fall of the Intoxication Defense, Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, Vol. 87, page 518 (1997).
+ McCord, The English and American History of Voluntary Intoxication to Negate Mens Rea, Journal of Legal History, Vol. 11, page 372 (1990).
+ Nemerson, Alcoholism, Intoxication, and the Criminal Law, Cardozo Law Review, Vol. 10, page 393 (1988).

Automatism
+ Grant, While You Were Sleeping or Addicted: A Suggested Expansion of the Automatism Doctrine to Include an Addiction Defense, University of Illinois Law Review, page 997 (2000). 

Incompetence to Stand Trial
+ Klein, Unreasonable: Involuntary Medications, Incompetent Criminal Defendants, and the Fourth Amendment, San Diego Law Review, Vol. 46, No. 1, page 161 (2009).
+ King, Candor, Zeal and Substitution of Judgment: Ethics and the Mentally Ill Criminal Defendant, American University Law Review, Vol. 58, page 207 (2008).
+ Predicting Restorability of Incompetent Criminal Defendant, Journal of the Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, Vol. 35, No. 1, page 34 (2007).

Insanity
+ Phillips, et al, The Insanity of the Mens Rea Model: Due Process and the Abolition of the Insanity Defense, Pace Law Review, Vol. 28, No. 3 , page  455 (2008).
+ Morse & Hoffman, The Uneasy Entente Between Legal Insanity and Mens Rea: Beyond Clark and Arizona, Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol. 97, page 1071 (2007).
+ Resnick, The Andrea Yates Case: Insanity on Trial, Cleveland State Law Review, Vol. 55, No. 2, page 147 (2007).
+ Aprilakis, The Warrior Returns: Struggling to Address Criminal Behavior by Veterans with PTSD, Georgetown Journal of Law & Public Policy, Vol. 3, page 541 (2005).
+ Bienstock, Mothers Who Kill Their Children and Postpartum Psychosis, Southwestern University Law Review,  Vol. 32, No,. 3, page 451 (2003).
+ Denno, Who Is Andrea Yates? A Short Story About Insanity, Duke Journal of Gender Law & Policy, Vol. 10, page 1 (2003).
+ Slobogin, The Integrationist Alternative to the Insanity Defense: Reflections on the Exculpatory Scope of Mental Illness in the Wake of the Andrea Yates Trial, American Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 30, page 315 (2003).
+ Keram, The Insanity Defense and Game Theory: Reflections on Texas v.Yates, Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, Vol. 30, No. 4, pp 470 (2002).
+ Slobogin, An End to Insanity: Recasting the Role of Mental Disability in Criminal Cases, Virginia Law Review, Vol. 86, page 1199 (2000).
+ Borum, Empirical Research on the Insanity Defense and Attempted Reforms: Evidence Toward Informed Policy, Law & Human Behavior, Vol. 117 (1999).
+ Oberman, Mothers Who Kill: Coming to Terms with Modern American Infanticide, American Criminal Law Review, Vol. 34, page 1 (1996).
+ Horan, The XYY Superrmale and the Criminal Justice System: A Square Peg in a Round Hole, Loyola of Los Angles Law Review, Vol. 25, page 1343 (1992).
+ Perlin, Unpacking the Myths: The Symbolism Mythology of Insanity Defense Jurisprudence, Case Western Reserve Law Review, Vol. 40, page 599 (1989-1990).
Morse, Excusing the Crazy: The Insanity Defense Reconsidered, California Law Review, Vol 58, page 777 (1985).
+Morris, Psychiatry and the Dangerous Criminal, Southern California Law Review, Vol. 41, page 514 (1968).

Diminished Capacity
+ Steelman, A Question of Revenge: Munchausen Syndrome By Proxy and a Proposed Diminished Capacity Defense for Homicidal Mothers, Cardozo Women's Law Journal, Vol. 8, page 261 (2002).
+ Mendez, Diminished Capacity in California: Premature Reports of Its Demise, Stanford Law and Policy Review, Vol. 3, page 216 (1991).
+ Dressler, Reaffirming the Moral Legitimacy of the Doctrine of Diminished Capacity: A Brief Reply to Professor Morse, Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol 75, page 953 (1984).
+ Morse, Undiminished Confusion in Diminished Capacity, Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, Vol. 75, page 1 (1984).
+ Arenella, The Diminished Capacity and Diminished Responsibility Defenses: Two Children of a Doomed Marriage, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 77, page 827 (1977).

Infancy
+ Scott, Blaming Youth, Texas Law Review, Vol. 81, page 799 (2003).
+ Duncan, "So Young and So Untender": Remorseless Children and the Expectations of the Law, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 102, page 1469 (2002).
+ Hofacker, How Young Is Too Young for a Child to Be Tried as an Adult?, Texas Tech Law Review, Vol. 34, page 159 (2002).
+ Beresford, Is Lowering the Age at Which Juveniles Can Be Transferred to Adult Criminal Court the Answer to Juvenile Crime? A State-By-State Assessment, San Diego Law Review, Vol. 37, page 783 (2000).

Self-Defense
+ Symposium on Self-Defense, American Criminal Law Review, Vol. 47 (2010).
+ Dressler, Feminist Reform of Self-Defense Law: Some Critical Reflections, Marquette Law Review, Vol.93, page 1475 (2010).
+ Forell, What's Reasonable?: Self-Defense and Mistake in Criminal and Tort Law, Lewis & Clark Law Review,Vol. 14, page 1401 (2010)
+ Ferzan, Self-Defense and the State, Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law, Volume 5, page 449 (2008).
+ Kim, The Rhetoric of Self-Defense, Berkeley Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 13, page 261 (2008).
+ Kaufman, Self-Defense, Imminence, and the Battered Woman, New Criminal Law Review, Vol. 10, No. 3, page 342 (2007).
+ Goodmark, The Punishment of Dixie Shanahan: Is There Justice for Battered Women Who Kill?, Kansas Law Review, Vol. 55, page 269 (2007).
+ Dressler, Battered Women and Sleeping Abusers: Some Reflections, Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 3, page 457 (2006).
+ Florida's Protection of Persons Bill, Harvard Journal on Legislation, Vol. 43, page 199 (2006).
+ Ferzan, Justifying Self-Defense, 24 Law and Philosophy 711 (2005).
+ Moriarty, "While Dangers Gather": The Bush Preemption Doctrine, Battered Women, Imminence, and Anticipatory Self-Defense, New York University Review of Law and Social Change, Vol. 30, page 22 (2005).
+ Segev, Fairness, Responsibility and Self-Defense, Santa Clara Law Review, Vol. 45 , No. 2, page 383 (2005).
+ Burke, Rational Actors, Self-Defense, and Duress: Making Sense, Not Syndromes, Out of the Battered Woman, North Carolina Law Review, Vol. 81, page 211 (2002).
+ Nourse, Self-Defense and Subjectivity, University of Chicago Law Review, Vol. 68, page 1235 (2001).
+ McCoy, The Homosexual-Advance Defense and Hate Crimes Statutes:Their Interaction and Conflict, Cardozo Law Review, Vol. 22, pp. 629 (2001).
+ Getman & Marshall, The Continuing Assault on the Right to Strike, Texas Law Review, Vol. 79, page 703 (2001).
+ Green, Castles and Carjackers: Proportionality and the Use of Deadly Force in Defense of Dwellings and Vehicles, University of Illinois Law Review, Vol. 1999, page 1 (1999).
- Fisher, The "Shoot the Carjacker" Law Under Fire, Emory Law Journal, Vol. 47 , page 1401 (1998).
+ Faigman et al., The Battered Woman's Syndrome in the Age of Science, Arizona Law Review, Vol. 39, page 67 (1997).
+ Lee, Race and Self-Defense: Toward a Normative Conception of Reasonableness, Minnesota Law Review, Vol. 81, page 367 (1996).
+ Raeder, The Double-Edged Sword: Admissibility of Battered Woman Syndrome by and Against Batterers in Cases Implicating Domestic Violence, University of Colorado Law Review, Vol. 67, page 789 (1996).
+ Schuller et al., Trials of Battered Women Who Kill: The Impact of Alternative Forms of Expert Testimony, Law & Human Behavior, Vol. 20, page 167 (1996).
+ Siegal, The Rule of Love: Wife Beating as Prerogative and Privacy, Yale Law Journal, Vol. 105, page 2117 (1996).
+ Morse, The "New Syndrome Excuse Syndrome", Criminal Justice Ethics, Vol. 14, page 3 (1995).
+ Coughlin, Excusing Women, California Law Review, Vol. 82, page 1 (1994).
+ Schopp et al., Battered Woman Syndrome, Expert Testimony, and the Distinction Between Justification and Excuse, University of Illinois Law Review, Vol 1994, page 45 (1994).
+ Rosen, On Self-Defense, Imminence and Women Who Kill Their Batterers, North Carolina Law Review, Vol. 71, page 371 (1993).
+ Williams, Controlling the Use of Non-Deadly Force: Policy and Practice, Harvard BlackLetter Law Journal, Vol. 10, page 79 (1993).
+ Dowd, Dispelling the Myths About the "Battered Woman's Defense": Towards a New Understanding, Fordam Urban Law Journal, Vol. 19, page 567 (1992).
+ McCord, Moral Reasoning and the Criminal Law: The Example of Self-Defense, American Criminal Law Review, Vol. 30, page 97 (1992).
+ Walker, Battered Women Syndrome and Self-Defense, Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy, Vol.6, page 321 (1992).
+ Allard, Rethinking Battered Woman Syndrome: A Black Feminist Perspective, UCLA Women's Law Journal, Vol. 1, page 191 (1991).
+ Maguigan, Battered Women and Self-Defense: Myths and Misconceptions in Current Reform Proposals , University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Vol. 140, page 79 (1991).
+ Mahoney, Legal Images of Battered Women: Redefining the Issue of Separation, Michigan Law Review, Vol. 90, page 1 (1991).
+ Kochan, Beyond the Battered Woman Syndrome: An Argument for the Development of New Standards and the Incorporation of a Feminine Approach to Ethics, Hastings Women's Law Journal, Vol. 1, page 89 (1989).
+ Singer, The Resurgence of Mens Rea: II - Honest But Unreasonable Mistake of Fact in Self-Defense, Boston College Law Review, Vol. 28, page 459 (1987).
+ Faigman, The Battered Women Syndrome and Self-Defense, Virginia Law Review, Vol. 72, page 619 (1986).
+ Schneider, Describing and Changing: Women's Self-Defense Work and the Problem of Expert Testimony on Battering, Women's Rights Law Reporter, Vol. 9, page 195 (1986).
+ Taylor, Provoked Reason in Men and Women: Heat-of-Passion Manslaughter and Imperfect Self-Defense, UCLA Law Review, Vol. 33, page 1679 (1986).
+ Donovan et al., Is the Reasonable Man Obsolete? A Critical Perspective on Self-Defense and Provocation, Loyola of Los Angeles law review, 435 (1981).
+ Fabricant, Homicide in Response to a Threat of Rape: A Theoretical Examination of the Rule of Justification, Golden Gate University Law Review, Vol. 11, page 945 (1981).
+ Beale, Retreat from a Murderous Assault, Harvard Law Review, Vol. 16, page 567 (1903).

Use of Force in Defense of Habitation
+ Carpenter, Of the Enemy Within, The Castle Doctrine, and Self-Defense, Marquette Law Review, Vol 86, No. 4, page 653 (2003).

Use of Force in Defense of Property
+ Green, Castles and Carjackers: Proportionality and the Use of Deadly Force in Defense of Dwellings and Property, 1999 University of Illinois Law Review, page 1.

Use of Force to Resist Unlawful Arrest
+ Chevigny, The Right to Resist an Unlawful Arrest, Yale Law Journal, Vol. 78, page 1128 (1969)

Use of Force in Law Enforcement
+ Blum, Scott v. Harris: Death Knell for Deadly Force Policies and Garner Jury Instructions?, Syracuse Law Review, Vol. 58, No. 1, page 45 (2007).
+ Frye, Tennessee v. Garner: The Issue Not Addressed, New York University Review of Law & Social Change, Vol. 14, page 721 (1986).
+ Uviller, Seizure by Gunshot: The Riddle of the Fleeing Felon, New York University Review of Law & Social Change, Vol. 14, page 705 (1986).

Use of Force to Discipline Children
+ Pollard, Banning Child Corporal Punishment, Tulane Law Review, Vol. 77, page 575 (2003).
+ Pollard, Banning Corporal Punishment: A Constitutional Analysis, American Criminal Law Review, Vol. 52, No. 2, page 447 (2002).
+ Bartman, Spare the Rod and Spoil the Child? Corporal Punishment in Schools Around the World, Indiana International & Comparative Law Review, Vol. 13, No. 1, page 283 (2002).

Consent to the Use of Force
+ Bergelson, Autonomy, Dignity, and Consent to Harm, Rutgers Law Review, Vol 60, page 723 (2008).
+ Bergelson, The Right to Be Hurt:Testing the Boundaries of Consent, George Washington Law Review, Vol. 75, page 165 (2007).

Necessity
+ Mikos, On the Limits of Supremacy: Medical Marijuana and the States' Overlooked Power to Legalize Federal Crime, Vanderbilt Law Review, Vol. 62, page 1421 (2009).
+ Hamrick, Is Looting Ever Justified?: An Analysis of Looting Laws and the Applicability of the Necessity Defense During Natural Disasters and States of Emergency, Nevada Law Journal, Vol. 7, page 182 (2006).
+ Martin, The Radical Necessity Defense, University of Cincinnati Law Review, Vol. 73, page 1527 (2005).
+ Quigley, The Necessity Defense in Civil Disobedience Cases: Bring in the Jury, New England Law Review, Vol. 38, Page 3 (2003).
+ Herman, United States v. Oakland Cannabis Buyer's Cooperative, Whatever Happened to Federalism?, Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, Vol. 95, page 121 (2002).
+ Parry et al., Interrogating Suspected Terrorists: Should Torture Be An Option?, University of Pittsburgh Law Review, Vol. 63, page 743 (2002).
+ Simeone, "Survivors" of the Eternal Sea: A Short True Story, St. Louis University Law Journal, Vol. 45, page 1123 (2001)
+ The Case of the Speluncean Explorers: A Fiftieth Anniversary Symposium, Harvard Law Review, Vol. 112, page 1834 (1999). (See below.)
+ Christie, The Defense of Legal Necessity Considered from the Legal and Moral Points of View, Duke Law Journal, Vol. 48, page 975 (1999).
+ Schulkind, Applying the Necessity Defense to Civil Disobedience Cases, New York University Law Review, Vol. 64, page 79 ( 1989).
+ Bauer, The State Made Me Do It: The Applicability of the Necessity Defense to Civil Disobedience, Stanford Law Review, Vol. 39, Page 1173 (1987).
+Senftle, The Necessity Defense in Abortion Clinic Trespass Cases, St. Louis University Law Journal, Vol. 32, page 523 (1987).
+ Greenawalt, Natural Law and Political Choice: The General Justification Defense - Criteria for Political Action and the Duty to Obey the Law, Catholic University Law Review, Vol. 36, page 1 (1986).
+ von Hirsch, Lifeboat Law, Criminal Justice Ethics, Vol. 4, page 88 (1985).
+ Dolinko, Intolerable Conditions as a Defense to Prison Escape, UCLA Law Review, Vol. 26, page 1126 (1979).
+ Fletcher, Should Intolerable Prison Conditions Generate a Justification or an Excuse for Escape, UCLA Law Review, Vol. 26, page 1355 (1979).
+ Tiffany et al., Legislating the Necessity Defense in Criminal Law, Denver Law Journal, Vol. 52, Page 839 (1975).
+ Fuller, The Case of the Speluncean Explorers, Harvard Law Review, Vol. 62, page 616 (1949).

Duress (Coercion, Compulsion)
+ Mulroy, The Duress Defense's Uncharted Terrain: Applying It to Murder, Felony Murder, and the Mentally Retarded Defendant, San Diego Law Review, Vol. 43, page 159 (2006).
+ Koh, Can the President Be Torturer in Chief? Indiana Law Journal, Vol. 81, page 1145 (2005).
+ Insco, Defense of Superior Orders Before Military Tribunals, Duke Journal of Comparative and International Law, Vol. 13, page 389 (2003).
+ Westen & Mangiafico, The Criminal Defense of Duress: A Justification, Not an Excuse - And Why It Matters, Buffalo Criminal Law Review, Vol. 6, page 833 (2003).
+ Morse, Culpability and Control, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Vol. 142, page 1587 (1994).
+ Dressler, Exegesis of the Law of Duress: Justifying the Excuse and Searching for Its Proper Limits, Southern
California Law Review, Vol. 62, page 1331 (1989).
+ Dressler, Professor Delgado's "Brainwashing" Defense: Courting a Determinist Legal System, Minnesota Law Review, Vol. 63, page 335 (1979).
+ Delgado, Ascription of Criminal States of MInd: Toward a Defense Theory for the Coercively Persuaded ("Brainwashed") Defendant, Minnesota Law Review, Vol. 63, page 1 (1978).
+ Lunde et al., Brainwashing as a Defense to Criminal Liability: Patty Hearst Revisited, Criminal Law Bulletin, Vol. 13, page 341 (1977).
+ Newman et al., Duress, Free Will and the Criminal Law, Southern California Law Review, Vol. 30, page 313 (1957)

Entrapment  (1)
+ Sherman, "A Person Otherwise Innocent": Policing Entrapment In Preventive, Undercover Counterterrorism, University of Pennsylvania Journal of Constitutional Law, Vol. 11, page 1475 (2009).
+ Carter, To Catch the Lion,Tether the Goat: Entrapment, Conspiracy, and Sentence Manipulation, Akron Law Review, Vol. 42, page 135 (2009).
+ Stevenson, Entrapment and Terrorism, Boston College Law Review, Vol. 49, page 125 (2008).
+ Carlton, Entrapment, Punishment and the Sadistic State, Virginia Law Review, Vol. 93, page 1081 (2007).
+ McAdams, The Political Economy of Entrapment, Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, Vol. 96, page 107 (2005).
+ Hay, Sting Operations, Undercover Agents, and Entrapment, Missouri Law Review, Vol.70, page 387 (2005).
+ Smith, Psychology, Factfinding and Entrapment, Michigan Law Review, Vol. 103, page 759 (2005).
+ Colquitt, Rethinking Entrapment, American Criminal Law Review, Vol. 41, page 1389 (2004).
+ Marcus, The Entrapment Defense, Ohio Northern University Law Review, Vol. 30, page 211 (2004).
+ Stevenson, Entrapment and the Problem of Deterring Police Misconduct, Connecticut Law Review, Vol. 37, page 67 (2004).
+ Ross, Valuing Inside Knowledge: Police Infiltration as a Problem for the Law of Evidence, Chicago-Kent Law Review, Vol. 79, page 1111 (2004).
+ Deis, Economics, Causation, and the Entrapment Defense, 2001 University of Illinois Law Review 1207 (2001).
+ Tawil, "Ready? Induce. Sting!": Arguing for the Government's Burden of Proving Readiness in Entrapment Cases, Michigan Law Review, Vol. 98, page 2371 (2000).
+ Ponsoldt & Marsh, Entrapment Where the Spoken Word Is the Crime, Fordham Law Review, Vol. 68, page 1199 (2000).
+ Garella, Reshaping the Federal Entrapment Defense: Jacobson v. United States, Washington Law Review, Vol. 68, page 185 (1993).
+ Linder, Journeying Through the Valley of Evil, North Carolina Law Review, Vol. 71, page 1111 (1993).
+ Bordiga et al.,The Entrapment Defense: Juror Comprehension and Decision Making, Law and Human Behavior, Vol. 12, page 19 (1988).
+ Goldwasser, After ABSCAM: An Examination of Congressional Proposals to Limit Targeting Discretion in Federal Undercover Investigations, Emory Law Journal, Vol. 36, page 75 (1987).
+ Whelan, Lead Us Not into (Unwarranted) Temptation: A Proposal to Replace the Entrapment Defense with a Reasonable-Suspicion Requirement, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Vol. 133, page 1193 (1985). 
+ Gershman, ABSCAM, the Judiciary, and the Ethics of Entrapment, Yale Law Journal, Vol. 91, page 1565 (1982).
+ Cleary, Due Process Defense When Government Agents Instigate and Abet Crime, Georgetown Law Journal, Vol. 67, page 1455 (1979)
+ Park, The Entrapment Controversy, Minnesota Law Review, Vol. 60, page 163 (1976).

Cultural Defense (1)(2)
+ D'nondt, The Cultural Defense as Courtroom Drama: The Enactment of identity, Sameness, and Difference in Criminal Trial Discourse, Law & Social Inquiry, Vol. 35, page 67 (2010).
+ Held, On the Boundaries of Culture as an Affirmative Defense, Arizona Law Review, Vol. 51, page 237 (2009).
+ Greenawalt, Cultural Defense: Reflections in the Light of the Model Penal Code and the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 6, page 1 (2008).
+ Donovan et al., Delimiting the Cultural Defense, Quinnipiac Law Review, Vol. 26, page 109 (2007).
+ Lee, Cultural Convergence: Interest Convergence Theory Meets the Cultural Defense, Arizona Law Review, Vol. 49, page 911 (2007).
+ Martin,  All Men Are (or Should Be) Created Equal: An Argument against the Use of the Cultural Defense in a Post-Booker World, William and Mary Bill of Rights Journal, Vol. 15, page 1305 (2007).
+ Uniacke, Emotional Excuses, Law and Philosophy, Vol. 26, page 95 (2007).
+ Zimbroff, Cultural Differences in Perceptions of and Responses to Sexual Harassment, Duke Journal of Gender Law and Policy, Vol. 14, page 1311 (2007).
+ Chiu, Culture in Our Midst, University of Florida Journal of Law and Public Policy, Vol. 17, page 231 (2006).
+ Chiu, Culture as Justification, Not Excuse,  American Criminal Law Review, Vol. 43, page 1317 (2006).
+ Hoeffel, Deconstructing the Cultural Evidence Debate, University of Florida Journal of Law and Public Policy, Vol. 17, page 303 (2006).
+ Kim, Blameworthiness, Intent, and Cultural Dissonance: The Unequal Treatment of Cultural Defense Defendants, University of Florida Journal of Law and Public Policy, Vol. 17,  page 199 (2006).
+ Kuo, Culture Clash: Teaching Cultural Defenses in the Criminal Law Classroom, Saint Louis University Law Journal, Vol. 48, page 1297 (2004).
+ Levine, Negotiating the Boundaries of Crime and Culture: A Sociological Perspective on Cultural Defense Strategies, Law & Social Inquiry, Vol. 28, page 39 (2003).
+ Neff, Removing the Blinders in Federal Sentencing: Cultural Difference as a Proper Departure Ground, Chicago-Kent Law Review, Vol. 78, page 445 (2003).
+ Volpp, On Culture, Difference, and Domestic Violence, American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & Law, Vol. 11, page 393 (2003).
+ Ly, The Conflict Between Law and Culture: The Case of the Hmong in America, Wisconsin Law Review, Vol. 2001, page 471 (2001).
+ Sikora, Differing Cultures, Differing Culpabilities: A Sensible Alternative: Using Cultural Circumstances as a Mitigating Factor in Sentencing, Ohio State Law Journal, Vol. 62, page 1695 (2001).
+ Sunder, Cultural Dissent, Stanford Law Review, Vol. 54, page 495 (2001).
+ Gibeaut, Troubling Translations: Cultural Defense Tactic Raises Issues of Fairness, ABA Journal, Vol. 85 (October), page. 93 (1999).
+ Wanderer et al., Culture and Crime: Kargar and the Existing Framework for a Cultural Defense, Buffalo Law Review, Vol. 47, page 829 (1999).
+ Fisher, The Human Rights Implications of a ‘Cultural Defense’ as an Excuse for Criminal Behavior, Southern California Interdisciplinary Law Journal, Vol. 6, page 663 (1998).
+ Brelvi, "News of the Weird": Specious Normativity and the Problem of the Cultural Defense, Columbia Human Rights Law Review, Vol. 28, page. 657 (1997).
+ Coleman, Individualizing Justice through Multiculturalism: The Liberal's Dilemma, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 96, page 1093 (1996).
+ Kanter, The Yenaldlooshi in Court and the Killing of a Witch: The Case for an Indian Cultural Defense, Southern California Interdisciplinary Law Journal, Vol. 4,  page 411 (1995).
+ Maguigan, Cultural Evidence and Male Violence: Are Feminist and Multiculturalist Reformers on a Collision Course in Criminal Courts?,  New York University Law Review, Vol. 70, page 36 (1995).
+ Matsumoto, A Place for Consideration of Culture in the American Criminal Justice System: Japanese Law and the Kimura Case, Detroit Journal of International Law, Vol. 4, page 507 (1995).
+ Chiu, The Cultural Defense: Beyond Exclusion, Assimilation, and Guilty Liberalism, California Law Review, Vol. 82, page 1053 (1994).
+ Volpp, Misidentifying Culture: Asian Women and the "Cultural Defense", Harvard Women's Law Journal, Vol. 17, page 57 (1994).
+ Renteln, A Justification of the Cultural Defense as Partial Excuse, California Review of Law & Women's Studies, Vol. 2, page 437 (1993).
+ Bryant, Oya-Ko Shinju: Death at the Center of the Heart, UCLA Pacific Basin Law Journal, Vol. 8, page 1 (1990).
+ Vuoso, Background, Responsibility, and Excuse, Yale Law Journal, Vol. 96, page 1661 (1987).
+ Sams,The Availability of the ‘Cultural Defense’ as an Excuse for Criminal Behavior, Georgia Journal of International and Comparative Law, Vol. 16, page 335 (1986).
+ Delgado, "Rotten Social Background": Should the Criminal Law Recognize a Defense of Severe Environmental Deprivation?, Law and Inequality Journal, Vol. 3, page 9 (1985).

Probation and Procreation
+ Miles, Criminal Consequences for Making Babies:Probation Conditions that Restrict Procreation, Washington and Lee Law Review, Vol. 59, No. 4, page 1545 (2003).

MPC Sentencing
+ Reitz, American Law Institute, Model Penal Code: Sentencing, Plan for Revision, Buffalo Criminal Law Review, Vol. 6 , No. 1, page 525 (2002).

Death Penalty   (List of Law Review and Journal Articles re Death Penalty)
+ Symposium - Victims and the Death Penalty: Inside and Outside the Courtroom, Cornell Law Review, Vol. 88, No. 2 (2003). (13 excellent articles with an emphasis on the use of victim impact evidence in capital cases).
+ Niland et al., Texas Law's "Life or Death" Rule in Capital Sentencing: Scrutinizing Eighth Amendment Violations and the Case of Juan Guerrero, Jr., St. Mary's Law Journal, Vol. 41, page 231 (2009).
+ Hurd, Death to  Rapists: A Comment on Kennedy v. Louisiana, Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 6, page 351 (2006).
+ Denno, The Lethal Injection Quandary: How Medicine Has Dismantled the Death Penalty, Fordham Law Review, Vol. 76, No. 1, page 49 (2007).
+ Shatz, The Eighth Amendment, the Death Penalty and Ordinary Robbery Murderers: A California Case Study, Florida Law Review, Vol. 59, page 719 (2007).
+ Tobolowsky, The Road to Atkins and Beyond in Texas - The Tale of One Mentally Retarded Capital Offender, Baylor Law Review , Vol. 59, No. 3, page 735 (2007).
+ Fagan, et al, Capital Punishment and Capital Murder: Market Share and the Deterrent Effects of the Death Penalty, Texas Law Review, Vol. 84, page 1803 (2006).
+ Bowers et al., The Decision Maker Matters: An Empirical Examination of the Way the role of the Judge and the Jury Influence Death Penalty Decision-Making, Washington & Lee Law Review, Vol. 63, page 931 (2006).
+ Gross et al., Exonerations in the United States 1989 Through 2003 , Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol. 95 , page 523 (2006).
+ Keckler, Life v. Death: Whom Should Capital Punishment Marginally Deter?, Journal of Law, Economics & Policy, Vol. 2, page 51 (2006).
+ Kleven, Is Capital Punishment Immoral Even If It Deters Murder?, Santa Clara Law Review, Vol. 46, page 599 (2006).
+ Marquis, The Myth of Innocence, Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol. 95, page 501 (2006).
+ Steiker et al., A Tale of Two Nations: Implementation of the Death Penalty in "Executing" Versus "Symbolic" States in the United States, Texas Law Review, Vol. 84, page 1869 (2006).
+ Sunstein et al., Ethics and Empirics of Capital Punishment: Is Capital Punishment Morally Required? Acts, Omissions, and Life-Life Tradeoffs, Stanford Law Review,Vol. 58, page 703 (2005).
+ Zimring, The Unexamined Death Penalty: Capital Punishment and Reform of the Model Penal Code, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 105, No. 4, page 1396 (2005).
+ Aumann, Death by Peers: The Extension of the Sixth Amendment to Capital Sentencing in Ring v. Arizona, Loyola University of Chicago Law Journal, Vol. 34, No. 4, page 845 (2003).
+ Capital Punishment and the Diagnosis of Mental Retardation, Atkins v. Virginia, Jurimetrics, Vol. 43, No. 4, page 415 (2003).
+ Despotes, Applying Atkins v. Virginia to Juvenile Defendants: The End Is Near for the Constitutionality of Executing Juveniles, McGeorge Law Review, Vol. 34, No. 4 page 851 (2003).   
+ Aarons, Reflections on the Killing State: A Cultural Study of the Death Penalty in the Twentieth Century United States, Tennessee Law Review, Vol. 70, No. 2, page 391 (2003).
+ Johnson, The Illusory Death Penalty: Why America's Death Penalty Process Fails to Support the Economic Theories of Criminal Sanctions and Deterrence, Hastings Law Journal, Vol. 52, page 1101 (2001).
+ McCord, State Death Sentencing for Felony Murder Accomplices Under the Enmund and Tison Standards, Arizona State Law Journal, Vol. 32, page 843 (2000).
+ Bentele, Back to an International Perspective on the Death Penalty as a Cruel Punishment, Tulane Law Review, Vol. 73, page 251 (1998).
+ Blume et al., Racial Discrimination Claims in Capital Cases, Cornell Law Review, Vol. 83, page 1771 (1998).
+ Garvey, Aggravation and Mitigation in Capital Cases: What Do Jurors Think?, Columbia Law Review, Vol. 98, page 1538 (1998).
+ Schabas, International Law and the Abolition of the Death Penalty, Washington & Lee Law Review, Vol. 55, page 797 (1998).
+ Tabak, How Empirical Studies Can Affect Positively the Politics of the Death Penalty, Cornell Law Review, Vol. 83, page 1431 (1998).
+ Bandes, Empathy, Narrative, and Victim Impact Statements, University of Chicago Law Review, Vol. 63, page 361 (1996).
+ Rapaport, Capital Murder and the Domestic Discount: A Study of Capital Murder in the Post-Furman Era, SMU Law Review, Vol. 49, page 1507 (1996).
+ Steiker, Sober Second Thoughts: Reflections on Two Decades of Constitutional Regulation of Capital Punishment, Harvard Law Review, Vol. 109, page 355 (1995).
+ Baldus et al., Reflections on the "Inevitability" of Racial Discrimination in Capital Sentencing and the "Impossibility" of Its Prevention, Detection, and Correction, Washington & Lee Law Review, Vol. 51, page 359 (1994).
+ Rosen, Felony Murder and the Eighth Amendment Jurisprudence of Death, Boston College Law Review, Vol. 31, page 1103 (1990).
+ Kennedy, McClesky v. Kemp: Race, Capital Punishment, and the Supreme Court, Harvard Law Review, Vol. 101, page 1388 (1988).
+ Lempert, Deterrence and Desert: An Assessment of the Moral Bases for Capital Punishment, Michigan Law Review, Vol. 79, pages 1177 (1981).

Comparative Criminal Liability
+ Final Report of the Maldivian Penal Law and Sentencing Codification Project 2006 ( A new Islamic Penal Code for the Maldives prepared by the University of Pennsylvania Law School Criminal Law Group).
+ Bergelson, Victims and Perpetrators: An Argument for Comparative Liability in Criminal Law, 8 Buffalo Criminal Law Review 385 (2005); Bergelson, Conditional Rights and Comparative Wrongs: More on the Theory and Application of Comparative Liability, 8 Buffalo Criminal Law Review 567 (2005).
+ Nestler, Sentencing in Germany, Buffalo Criminal Law Review, Vol. 7, page 109 (2004).

Victims' Rights
+ Dubber, The Victim in American Penal Law: A Systematic Overview, Buffalo Criminal Law Review, Vol. 3, page 3 (2000).
+ Henderson, The Wrongs  of Victim's Rights, Stanford Law Review, Vol.37, page 937 (1985).

Sentencing
+ Symposium on Model Penal Code's Sentencing Proposals, Florida Law Review, Vol. 61, No. 4, page 665 (2009).
+  Berman, The Roots and Reality of Blakely, Criminal Justice, Vol. 19, page 56 (2005).
+ Etienne, The Declining Utility of the Right to Counsel in Federal Criminal Courts: An Empirical Study on the Diminished Role of Defense Attorney Advocacy Under the Sentencing Guidelines, California Law Review, Vol. 92, No. 2,  page 323 (2004).
+ Marcus, Comments on the Model Penal Code: Sentencing Preliminary Draft No. 1 , American Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 30, No. 2, page 135 (2003).

Punishment 
+ Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law Symposium: Mercy and Clemency.
+ 2004 Stanford Law Review Symposium: Punishment and Its Purpose (April 2004).
+ Stinneford, The Original Meaning of "Unusual": The Eighth Amendment as a Bar to Cruel Innovation, Northwestern University Law Review, Vol. 102,  page 1739 (2008).
+ Francis et al, The Optimal Penalty for Sexually Transmitting HIV, American Law and Economics Review, Vol. 10, No. 2, page 388 (2008).
+ Cahill, Retributive Justice in the Real World, Washington University Law Review, Vol. 85, page 815 (2007).
+ Carlsmith, et al, The Function of Punishment in the "Civil" Commitment of Sexually Violent Predators, Behavioral Sciences & the Law, Vol. 25, page 437 (2007).
+ Garvey, Lifting the Veil on Punishment, Buffalo Criminal Law Review, Vol. 7, page 443 (2004).
+ Meares, et al, Updating the Study of Punishment, Stanford Law Review, Vol. 56, page 1171 (2004).
+ Bader, "Forgive me Victim for I Have Sinned": Why Repentance and the Criminal Justice System Do Not Mix - A Lesson from Jewish Law, Fordham Urban Law Journal, Vol 31, page 69 (2003).
+ Hoffman, The Case for Jury Sentencing, Duke Law Journal, Vol. 52, page 951 (2003).
+ Robinson & Darley, The Role of Deterrence in the Formulation of Criminal Law Rules: At Its Worst When Doing Its Best, Georgetown Law Journal, Vol. 91, No. 5 , page 949 (2003)
+ Fishman, Old Testament Justice, Catholic University Law Review, Vol. 51, page 405 (2002).
+ Kay, The Agony of Ecstasy: Reconsidering the Punitive Approach to United States Drug Policy, Fordham Urban Law Journal, Vol. 29, page 2133 (2002).
+ Kennedy, Making the Punishment Fit the Crime, Emory Law Journal, Vol. 51, page 753 (2002).
+ Olson, Rethinking Mandatory Minimums after Apprendi, Northwestern University Law Review, Vol. 96, page 811 (2002).
+ Strauss, Losing Sight of the Utilitarian Forest for the Retributivist Trees: An Analysis of the Role of Public Opinion in a Utilitarian Model of Punishment, Cardozo Law Review, Vol 23, page 1549 (2002).
+ Vitiello, Punishment and Democracy: A Hard Look at Three Strikers' Overblown Promises, California Law Review, Vol. 90, page 257 (2002).
+ Beres, et al., Habitual Offender Statutes and Criminal Deterrence, Connecticut Law Review, Vol. 34, page 55 (2001).
+ Robinson, Punishing Dangerousness: Cloaking Preventive Detention as Criminal Justice, Harvard Law Review, Vol. 114, page 1429 (2001).
+ Binder et al., Framed: Utilitatianism and Punishment of the Innocent, Rutgers Law Journal, Vol, 32, page 115 (2000).
+ Cotton, Back with a Vengeance: The Resilience of Retribution as an Articulated Purpose of Criminal Punishment, American Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 37, page 1313 (2000).
+ Finkelstein, Positivism and the Notion of an Offense, California Law Review, Vol. 99, page 335 (2000).
+ Simons, The Relevance of Community Values to Just Deserts: Criminal Law, Punishment Rationales, and Democracy, Hofstra Law Review, Vol. 28, page 635 (2000).
+ Harcourt, The Collapse of the Harm Principle, Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, Vol. 90, page 109 (1999).
+ Donohue, Allocating Resources Among Prisons and Social Programs in the Battle Against Crime, Journal of Legal Studies, Vol. 27, page 1 (1998).
+ Garvey, Can Shaming Punishments Educate?, University of Chicago Law Review, Vol. 65, page 733 (1998).
+ Whitman, What Is Wrong with Inflicting Shame Sanctions?, Yale Law Journal, Vol. 107, page 1055 (1998).
+ Robinson, The Utility of Desert, Northwestern University Law Review, Vol. 91, page 453 (1997). 
+ Kahan, What Do Alternative Sanctions Mean?, University of Chicago Law Review, Vol. 63, page 591 (1996).
+ Sklansky, Cocaine, Race, and Equal Protection, Stanford Law Review, Vol. 47, page 1283 (1995).
+ Massaro, Shame, Culture and American Criminal Law, Michigan Law Review, Vol. 89, page 1880 (1991).
+ Vitiello, Reconsidering Rehabilitation, Tulane Law Review, Vol. 65, page 1011 (1991).
+ Feinberg, The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law - Harmless Wrongdoing, Oxford University Press (1988).
+ Gruner, To Let the Punishment Fit the Organization: Sanctioning Corporate Offenders Through Corporate Probation, American Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 16, page 1 (1988).
+ Feinberg, The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law - Harm to Self, Oxford University Press (1986).
+ Feinberg, The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law - Offense to Others, Oxford University Press (1985).
+ Feinberg, The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law  - Harm to Others, Oxford University Press (1984).
+ Coffee, "No Soul to Damn;No Body to Kick": An Unscandalized Inquiry into the Problem of Corporate Punishment, Michigan Law Review, Vol. 79, page 386 (1981).
+ Posner, Optimal Sentences for White-Collar Criminals, American Criminal Law Review, Vol. 17, page 409 (1980).
+ Nagel, The Enforcement of Morals, The Humanist, Vol. 3, page 20 (1968).
+ Packer, The Limits of the Criminal Sanction, Stanford University Press (1968).
+ Morris, The Honest Politician's Guide to Crime  Control, University of Chicago Press (1970).
+ Andenaes, The Morality of Deterrence, University of Chicago Law Review, Vol. 37, page 649 (1970).
+ Menninger, The Crime of Punishment, Viking Press (1966).
+ Andenaes, The General Preventive Effects of Punishment, University of Pennsylvania, Vol. 114, page 949 (1966).
+ Devlin, The Enforcement of Morals, Oxford University Press (1965).
+ H.L.A. Hart, Law, Liberty, and Morality, Stanford University Press (1963).
+ Henry M. Hart, The Aims of the Criminal Law, Law and Contemporary Problems, Vol. 23, page 401 (1958).
+ H.L.A. Hart, Murder and the Principles of Punishment: England and the United States, Northwestern University Law Review, Vol. 52. pages 433 (1957).

Civil Commitment Based On Sexual Dangerousness (1)(2)(3)(4)
+ Vars, Rethinking the Indefinite Detention of Sex Offenders, Connecticut Law Review, Vol. 44, page __ (2011).
+ Maas, Erosion of Constitutional Rights in Commitment of Sex Offenders, William Mitchell Law Review, Vol. 29, No. 4, page 1241 (2000).

Torture
+ Rumann, Tortured History: Finding Our Way Back to the Lost Origins of the Eighth Amendment, Pepperdine Law Review, Vol. 31, page 661 (2004).

Private Prisons
+ Dolovich, State Punishment and Private Prisons, Duke Law Journal, Vol. 55, page 439 (2005).

Individual Rights and Terrorism Prevention (1)
+ Frakt, Mohammed Jawad and the Military Commissions of Guantanamo, Duke Law Journal, Vol. 60, page 1367 (2011). (This will give you a good insight into the unjust military tribunals trying accused terrorists.)
+ Abrams, The Material Support Terrorism Offenses: Perspectives Derived from the (Early) Model Penal Code, J. Nat'l Sec. L., Vol. 1, page 5 (2005).
+  Schmid, Terrorism - The Definitional Problem, Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law, Vol. 36, page 375 (2004).
+ Civil Liberties and the Terrorism Prevention Paradigm: The Guilt By Association Critique, Michigan Law Review, Vol. 101 (2003).
+ Cole, Enemy Aliens, Stanford Law Review, Vol. 54, page 953 ( 2002).
+ Martinez, Prosecuting Terrorists at the International Criminal Court: Possibilities and Problems, Rutgers Law Journal, Vol. 34, No. 1, page 1 (2002).

Exoneration
+ Symposium, Convicting the Innocent, New England Law Review, Vol. 46, No. 617 (2012).

Children as Victims and Witnesses to Crime
+ Symposium, Children as Victims and Witnesses in the Criminal Trial Process, Law and Contemporary Problems, Vol. 65, page 1 (2002).

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